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Old 11-12-2009, 06:03 AM   #184
JordanJP
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Join Date: Nov 2009
I've got a few tips for you guys..only read to page seven or so, please don't kill me if these have been posted before.

I'll give a few examples in my limited paintball experience/Army ROTC training.

1. We had a squad of about 9 people split into two elements- a squad leader, and two teams of four each with a designated team leader (Alpha/Bravo). We were going uphill and into the sun (HUGE no-no, avoid it if possible) when the opposing force had set up an ambush on top of the hill, divided into two elements:

X= us
O= them
--- = hilltop.

TTT= cover (scrubby, low-lying bushes)

OOO OO OOO
TTTT TT TT TTT TT T TT T T
---------------------------------------------------
TT TTT TT TTTTT
TTT TTT TT T TTTTT TTT X
XX XX X X X

What happened? We maintained suppressive fire. By utilizing the people on the edges of the formation as suppressive fire/support, we were able to eliminate six of them while only taking two losses ourselves. The females on my team (yes, females!!!) managed to sneak around my side and put fire on them from their left. Then, the three enemy on the right all jammed their guns (tippmann 98 Cs) at the same time, resulting in one of the females scoring two "kills" and with myself scoring one kill by getting a guy directly between the eyes.

Morals of the story:
1. Use suppressive fire, cover, and formations to your advantage.
2. You may not have mics/walkie-talkies or whatever, but communicate. We are taught to stay at least 5-10 meters away from the people on our right/left in the event of a sniper, mortar, or grenade. This also allows us to be able to see hand signals when they are given.
3. Psych them out. Once they already know where you are, there really isn't any point in hiding anymore. YELL. It could make the difference between them thinking that there are two of you, versus them thinking there are six of you. We are encouraged to be loud once the enemy has engaged, unless given orders to the contrary (i.e. stealthily flank while other team is getting fired upon.)


Another example is that when we played last week, it was just a drill- we weren't issued paintball gear except for masks, while the instructors did have their guns ready to go. The point of the excercise was to react to small enemy units/sniper fire. I was too close to a teammate and one ball ended up splattering her and getting me right in the face mask (thankfully, it wasn't real life, otherwise she'd have had a graze wound and I would have been missing half my face.) We then had a friendly cross our line of fire, which resulted in him getting friendly-fired upon.

Lessons here are:
1. Keep your spacing. Yes, that bush may be the only cover for 30 feet, but don't bunch up behind it. One person, one piece of cover (assuming it's doable.) Teammates suppress enemy while you make a mad dash for another bush so the other team doesn't score two kills with one stone.
2. KNOW WHERE YOUR TEAMMATES ARE AT. Even if you are wearing armbands and such, it may be difficult in a heavy firefight to know whether it's a tango or a friendly. NEVER cross your teammates' lines of fire.
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