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Palmers Pursuit Shop Blazer Reviews

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Palmers Pursuit Shop Blazer
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Number of Reviews: 57
Average Rating: 9.8 / 10
Manufacturer Website: Click here
Suggested Retail Price: $400

Manufacturer DescriptionSubscribe to Reviews on this Product - Edit this Product Listing
Features: Vertical Bottle, Trigger Shoe, Anodized Aluminum Body, Lightweight, Easy Field Stripping, and Maximum Performance Valve.
Product Availability 
The Palmers Pursuit Shop Blazer is newer, so it should be commonly available, both new and used.
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Unregistered User Wednesday, March 20th, 2002
Period of
Product Use:
Only tested29 of 30 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Typhoon ('96), Blazer ('98), Palmer Cocker ('00).
These are all Palmer products and I've noticed that the trigger feel gets smoother and nicer with the newer models. The Blazer tested here is no exception - it's trigger is the nicest of all the Palmer markers I've tried.
Marker Setup: Matrix (LED w/ pushbutton) with AA Messiah @ sub-200psi input. Trinity reg, High Efficiency (Red & Blue) bolt kit. AA Armageddon 68ci 4500psi, no drop forward, set at 800psi.
Palmer Cocker same, except AA Vigilante @ 325psi input.

Lapco, Custom Products and DYE aluminum barrels of various bore sizes. 12V Revies w/X-boards and 6-arm paddles.
Recommended
Upgrades:
Get the 45 grip frame (either single or dual shoe, whatever you prefer). It makes the Blazer feel really solid and the setup is SO nice for the trigger you don't need the ProTouch option. For an extra $65(single) or $85 (dual) it's money well spent.

Get the 12" barrel vented (reduce noise & turbulence) & match-honed (optimize accuracy). If you can live without the nickel plating, having a bare brass barrel gives the gun a funky, old school look.

Get a Stabilizer with the gun, or buy an Air America Vigilante or Black Ice as an aftermarket reg. The Blazer works great at around 500 to 600psi.

Don't bother with the LP/HV valve. The Blazer is an awesome medium pressure gun. With medium pressures, you can pretty well eliminate having to change your barrels for paint matching purposes.
Strengths: THE TRIGGER with the 45 GRIP FRAME!

I needed to put that in caps. The Blazers have this stigma that the trigger pull on them is heavy and stiff. That may have been true on older models (comparing an older 1998 Blazer with dual trigger to this 2002 Blazer dual trigger, the old '98 is certainly heavier and longer in trigger pull). But if you order a Blazer with the 45 grip frame, the trigger is, in a word, INCREDIBLE.

The pull is very, very short. Measured movement in the center of the upper finger groove is a stunning 1mm. This is incredibly short for a mechanical-only trigger. Even the bottom sweep of the dual shoe is still a short 3.75mm. That's well under a stock Cocker's trigger pull, and you'll find even some high priced custom Cockers with trigger pulls of 4mm.

I would characterize the feel of the return spring as "springy". I wouldn't call it soft or mushy, and it's certainly not hard. If I had to compare it another recent marker I've used, the SFL, I would say it's a bit softer than the SFL. The SFL I would call "snappy". Sorry I can't be more precise about this, but I don't have a way to measure the actual pull in lbs.

Fast strings of rapid fire are easy with this trigger. It can be fired as fast as any custom, high end Cocker.

The bottom line is, the Blazer with the 45 grip and trigger assembly option, has a very smooth, short trigger that is not heavy. So forget about the old stereotype of the Blazer having a heavy, unwieldy trigger. Yet, because it's a Palmer, this is not some unreliable trigger that's been pushed past the edge of reliability. It's like the three previous Palmers I mention above - it's built with the same dependability as those markers. All three of the older Palmer markers I've used have NEVER required re-timing, even the 6 year old Typhoon.

For the extra $65 to $85, get the 45 grip frame option. The 45 grip frame improves the trigger pull so much, Palmer's doesn't even offer a ProTouch trigger job option for it. The improvement comes with the price of the grip frame (and you're still under $500 for a top notch gun).

Very light in weight. Very short in length. Doesn't extend as far back as a Cocker, so it's less likely to hit your lens or mask.

This Blazer came with a Stabilizer. Good choice for an in-line reg. The Stab adds about $95 to the price. If that's too much for your budget, an Air America Vigilante, which is priced less, will work just as well. An in-line reg will allow you to reduce the input pressure to around 500 to 600psi, which is the optimum working pressure for the Blazer with its regular valving.

If you must have the Low Pressure/High Volume valve option, it will add more cost to the gun and it won't reduce the pressure that much (goes under 400psi or so). If you really want an ultra low pressure gun, then buy a Palmer Cocker (300 to 350psi), an AKA marker or a Matrix (around 200psi) instead. The Blazer is really at its best as a medium pressure marker.

By leaving the Blazer with its regular valve, you'll have superior range and eliminate the need to change your barrels to try and attempt to match the barrel to the paint. Medium pressure guns are much less sensitive to bore-to-paint match. The Blazer's barrel, which features the famous Palmer elliptical design (tight at breech end, large in the mid-bore, tight again at the muzzle), will shoot almost any size paint, esp. when combined with medium pressure. The barrel also features three indentations or Wedgits at the breech end, which will prevent rollout of small paint.

The only reason to change barrels is if you want a shorter or longer barrel.

Closed bolt accuracy. Once again, we're talking Autococker class here. Snap shooting is a breeze.

Quick release bolt with a pin that doesn't have to be removed (woo-hoo!). Quality Palmer parts which are built inside the body. The famous Palmer Rock allows absolute minimum pressure to the cycling of the bolt, which helps to reduce paint chop. Quality build.

Can work well on CO2 or HPA. If you don't fire an entire hopper's worth of paint, CO2 will work just fine. if you like chucking a lot of paint, then HPA will work great on the Blazer too, on both the regular as well as the LP/HV valves.

Very reasonable price for a marker that is easily as good as any top, pneumatic marker. Even if you add the 45 grip frame, in-line reg and barrel options (vents, match honing), you still have a competitively priced marker.
Weaknesses: I took this marker to a field where the staff are Matrix and Cocker fans. These guys are used to $1000+ markers. The shop owner (who uses Matrices & Cockers) was so impressed he wanted to buy the Blazer. 3 out of the 4 people who shot the Blazer did so perfectly with no time needed to adapt to the trigger.

The 4th person, however, managed to chop a ball. He's used to using a Matrix and finds he chops on most pneumatic guns. It's possible to short stroke the Blazer, just as it's possible to do so on any Cocker. So players who are used to electro's may need time to adapt to it.

If you want to do a lot of upgrades to your gun, the Blazer isn't the gun for you. Almost all the aftermarket products are made by Palmer anyway. If you look at their option menu for the Blazer, there's actually plenty of choice. But compared to all the accessories available for a Cocker, it's a small list.

If you believe in ultra low pressure markers, the Blazer is not your gun. To me, this is a non-issue. If a gun is accurate at ultra low pressure (like my Matrix), that's fine. If a gun is accurate at medium pressure (like this Blazer) that's fine too. But if you must have ultra low pressure, then get a Palmer Cocker instead, or any of the various other manufacturers' markers that are designed specifically for low pressure.
Conclusion: GREAT trigger feel with the 45 grip frame. Don't believe in the old myth that Blazers have a stiff trigger pull. Blazers today have a short, smooth and springy trigger that's a pleasure to use. Easily a match for any high end Cocker that you can think of.

Use an in-line reg (either the Palmer Stabilizer or an aftermarket reg like the AA Vigilante). The Blazer likes medium pressure (500 to 600psi) best.

Accurate and great for snapshooting. Great parts. Quality build. Can go either CO2 or HPA with no mods. Can withstand severe tournament use.

May take some getting used to if you use an electro. Low upgrade path.

Fantastic value, even with the 45 grip frame upgrade (HIGHLY recommended) and barrel options. The Blazer is a best buy.
Rating:
10 out of 10
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Brophog Saturday, November 6th, 2004
Period of
Product Use:
1 year10 of 10 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Most mechanical markers on the market. The Blazer compares only to the top end cockers and mags.
Marker Setup: Blazer 2K
Vertical Feed
Armson ProDot
Empire Reloader
Recommended
Upgrades:
None
Strengths: Very Reliable.
Stable Shooting Platform.
Superior Accuracy.
Superb Customer Service.
Weaknesses: Uncommon marker.
Review: The Palmer Blazer is a wonderful design. It is a pneumatic marker similiar to the autococker and typhoon, but with a completely internal design. There are absolutely no hoses, internal or external. The ram setup is similiar to a cocker, but with a very large heavy duty ram shaft and a masterlink system to connect the hammer to the bolt. Due to the design, the body is very short, but a little wider than most markers due to the LPR and ram being mounted to the sides rather than on the front.

Anyone that is familiar with pneumatic semi-auto markers will quickly understand the advantages of such a design. This marker is a very stable shooting platform, especially when compared to blowback type markers that tend to shake violently upon firing and subsequent recocking. The marker is a closed bolt setup, which maximizes efficiency, and has a very large diameter bolt and valve chamber to allow for a great deal of choice in operating pressures.

Where the Blazer excels against other pneumatics is in the design. While the design allows for no modification or tinkering, it is very solid. When you pick one up, you'll notice the light weight, but the marker is more solid than you would think by the weight. There is no flimsy metal, thin metal, or plastic to degrade over time. Problems are few and far between, and it is very rare for a blazer owner to experience any problems, aside from changing out seals every few years. Maintenance consists of washing the marker down with water, letting it dry, and oiling it with air tool oil. It's every bit as rugged as any Tippmann, and with the convenient quick bolt system it is much faster to disassemble.

The Blazer performs incredibly. The 45 trigger frame is very comfortable and very quick. It is quicker than I am, but admittedly I am not a fast finger due to all of my years playing pump exclusively. The trigger is very short and snappy. The timing problems of cockers are non-existent with this design. I can not short stroke it, and have only found one person whom can do it intentionally. This Blazer has yet to chop a ball.

The unique thing about all of Palmer's markers is the brass barrel with vice lock system. The barrel is not threaded, and that was an initial concern of mine. However, the barrel and body fit so tightly together that the vice lock is more of a safety measure than anything. The barrel fits perfectly in the body, unlike most threaded designs that have a measure of wiggle to them. I never take my barrel off, and in the event of a barrel break, I simply pull the bolt and pull a squeegie through it. As with all Palmer barrels, there is a wedgit system. Anyone familiar with closed bolt markers knows how much of a pain it is to deal with rollouts, even with various barrel kits. So far, the wedgits have performed wonderfully. I've yet to find a ball that did not fit perfectly in the barrel, although I'm sure some of the cheaper balls under extremely cold and dry conditions would probably roll out.

The marker chronos very easily through the use of a screw on the back of the marker. The consistency is what I consider very good, or in other words, noticeable only due to the natural inconsistencies in ball sizes. With a stabilizer I get very good consistency in all weather conditions. It's a nice touch by Palmer to make the velocity screw and stabilizer pressure adjustment screw the same size. This makes fine tuning at the chrono station very quick and easy.

Conclusion: Overall I would recommend this marker to anyone wanting a top end mechanical marker. It's rugged enough to take through the deepest muck at your local woods or scenario game, but small enough and fast enough to play a game of speedball as well. The fact that it works great on CO2 or HPA makes going to unknown fields a breeze. I simply have my stabilizer set at about 400, and can switch between an HPA tank or CO2 tank to fit the conditions.

Update: It's been 1 year now, and I stand by everything I said. The trigger is broken in, allowing faster firing, but also a tad easier to short stroke. You still have to deliberately do so and it is still not a problem. This is the perfect scenario gun for someone that plays 10 plus games a year. It has all of the speed necessary in that enviromnent and you pull it out of the bag and it works! Simply chrono the marker and get on the field!
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Tuesday, June 7th, 2005 at 2:50 am PST
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RamboPreacher Saturday, February 2nd, 2002
Period of
Product Use:
More than 5 years8 of 12 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
The autococker would be the closest comparative pneumatic semi-marker. I have had about 8 different cockers of the years and don't own any currently (does that say anything?) Cockers are great if you wnat to tinker with your marker all the time,a dn you can deal with down time. But if you want a marker that works, the Blazer is the one. (can there be only one?)
Marker Setup: Which one? oh for the purposes of this review, my blazer is completely stock aesthetically speaking. I will list the additions:
bottom line stabe on a stock
original (really old) wooden PMI grips (similar to SP, but natural wood)
cut, polished nickle, named sight hood (Charity)
shocktech LP chamber
*" BOA barrel (although there is absolutely nothting wrong with my stock brass 10.5" barrel
I recently started using a ricochet2k on her
I normaly use a 16oz "pinaple" anti-siphon tank, though I have a couple different HPA's for cold temps and for easier fills at tournies. (I prefer co2)
I also tinkered and got a small pressure guage on the back of my rock (on a 90 degree elbow)
Recommended
Upgrades:
Upgrades... Let me start by saying that contrary to the popular misconception - the Blazer trigger is not bad. It is not too heavy nor is it sloppy at all. My blazer is one of the originals (SN BZ006), and it's trigger was a bit heavy at first, and I did get s Pro-touch trigger job about a year after I had it (mostly cause I had an extra hundred bucks and wnated to see teh difference). If you are a double finger trigger person (I am not), then I recommend that you do NOT get a PTTJ.

Other than aesthetics (ano and other eye-candies), I would say the next thing to get after you decide on a blazer (bone stock) is a stabe. Maybe in conjunction with a bottom line setup if you play that way, but that too is a personal preference.
Strengths: What would you expect from the man that invented the pneumatic automation system. With the capability to have a extremely high rate of fire, this thing can spray with the best of the JAE's (Just Another Electro). The problem there is - what kind of hopper can feed it that fast? Not even a force system like a warpfeed, since it won't work on such a smooth working marker like the blazer without some special modifications.

The Blazer is always being fine tuned and even though mine is one of the first ones available, I still love it. There has been many updates to teh base system over the last few years and it is alwasy being developed. It started as teh culmination of what was learned from making Typhoons from scratch over may years previous to the release of the Blazer.
Weaknesses: hmmm... Other than the comments about it being ugly (which I disagree with), or that it is a chopped off looking cocker, or that it is just another cocker clone (which as I aluded to earlier is just the opposite if reality) - The only things that I can see that might be considered bad is that more people don't know about them. Palmers doesn't do much advertising and as a matter of fact, if I hadn't interceded and created palmer-pursuit.com, and given it to them, it may not be around today. - and I guess there is the possible issue of teh short-stroking. Some people just don't know how to shoot a two stage trigger (and therefore they can't shoot a cocker either). no trigger flutterers allowed.
Conclusion: The Blazer is, in my opinion, the best marker for the money. A bone stock blazer is ready to take out of the box, gass up, load up and play in a tourney. There is not much choice to upgrades, but you don't need to upgrade stuff that is already industry standard in 3rd party upgrades for other markers.

If you do upgrade, get a stabe, then deal with the trigger feel next (double finger trigger, OR the PTTG).
Rating:
10 out of 10
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af895 Friday, December 22nd, 2006
Period of
Product Use:
3 months6 of 6 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
1 year
Similar
Products Used:
SP-8, Tippmann A-5, 98 Custom, electros (Matrices, PM/DM's, PMR, Egos) LineSI Bushmaster... nothing like a Blazer.
Marker Setup: Palmer Pursuit Shop Blazer ser#: BZ2581, Right-hand feed neck
12" double-ported PPS Brass barrel, matched with sight bead, brass finish
vertical male stabilizer (a PPS high-pressure regulator)
Pure Energy 68/4500 HPA bottle
Pure Energy remote line
Recommended
Upgrades:
Don't even think of tampering with perfection.
Strengths: SILENT. Like "crickets chirping" silent. Accurate, reliable, easy to clean, fast.
Weaknesses: Ability to short stroke the two-stage trigger
Review: Wow.

I'm an SP-8 owner who wanted something durable, consistent and easy to maintain.

Since playing with the Blazer, I've decided to sell the SP-8. The Blazer is fantastic.

BACKGROUND
My interest in Palmer Pursuit Shop (PPS) products started when I was looking for the most accurate barrel possible for my SP-8. I bought a 14" unported PPS Brass barrel with Ion threads and was stunned at how consistent and paint-tolerant it was.

I did some reading on the Blazer online. Much like the barrels, there's little posted about them but what is posted glows with admiration.

The last straw was having my SP-8 run low on battery power during a long game and having to walk off. I'm fairly diligent about changing batteries so that event soured me on electros. Further, having the gun turn itself off after an "idle" time, ostensibly to conserve battery power, caused me to miss a shot during another game when I pulled the trigger and had nothing happen.

After those events, I decided I'd look at full mechanical guns with reputations for high-reliability, extreme accuracy and ease of cleaning.

The Automag and Autococker were two of the guns I looked at until I learned more about the Blazer. The latter uses "Autococker-like" action - it's a closed bolt gun * with an LPR to supply low-pressure gas to the system that re-cocks the gun. Essentially, like the cocker, the design evolved from a pump gun with a mechanism that automatically "pumps" or "recocks" the action, hence the term "autococker."

I've heard a number of different stories as to where the Blazer design came from. Though I haven't comfirmed with PPS yet, a common one is that PPS used to build Autococker parts and went on to design a "perfected autococker" where all of the moving parts are contained in the body instead of sitting externally.

The advantage of Blazer over Autocockers is said to be that they never go out of tune unless messed with, staying in perfect working order for years.

* closed bolt guns put the ball in the barrel, sealed at the rear by the bolt, when the gun is idle. An open bolt gun has the bolt back behind the ball feedneck when idle.

NOISE
It's *silent* - with a slight "click" of the ram moving back and forth and crickets chirping in the background. The double-ported 12" barrel makes the gas release practically inaudible.

I was playing my first game as a Dagger - only two of us against four of them. Despite being 20' from my teammate, he told me later, he had NO IDEA where I was. Ditto the other team who just said "all we heard was paint arriving...we didn't know where it came from." (they were 40'-60' away)


ACCURACY
Paint goes STRAIGHT. Even the crappy paint I was playing with - basically "whatever we found laying around" - painted a perfect arc. Interestingly, I chopped one (probably my first short-stroke - or rather, my friend's, as I was letting him take a few shots and he's used to an electro) - and it shot as well through the break as any other barrel or gun. More zingers but still shootable to a point. Pull the bolt out, run a swab through and it's back to ropes. *

The gun has little to no kick. You feel the bolt cycle as a slight "tap" but it's aligned with the longitudinal axis of the marker and it doesn't cause it to jump. The act of squeezing the trigger causes more marker motion than the action cycling.

* Of note: your BEST bet for cleaning is a pull-through type swap - the type that look like a wire with little discs attached at even intervals terminating with a small swab or rag. I didn't have any luck with a Dye double-swab - it's too short and when I tried to pull it out the rest of the way, it seperated leaving me to remove half a swab! Save yourself some headaches and buy a pull-through, cord-type barrel cleaner at the same time as you get the Blazer. Various online-retailers have these. Get one designed for a 16" barrel if you have a Blazer with 10.5" or 12" barrel and you'll have plenty of length.

...more to come...
I will post a more detailed review once I've got more time playing with the Blazer but unless there's some hidden gremlin in it, I'd give it an 11/10. It far surpasses all of my expectations.
Conclusion: "Electros vs. the Blazer" - we're really talking about "handmade bamboo flyfishing rod with brass reel" versus "mass-produced graphite rod with plastic reel." I can catch fish with either but the latter has no character.

10 years from now, nobody will be hot on Ions, DM6's, Egos etc. "The next big thing" will be on the market, being pushed with glossy ads, and we'll have forgotten about the previous "big thing."

A Blazer will still be a Blazer and looked at with respect. This is a gun, like an Automag, that you buy and keep forever. Take a break from paintball for 10 years, dust off the Blazer, oil it up and GO.

No running out of batteries, no short-circuits, no excuses - this gun just works.
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Tuesday, February 27th, 2007 at 6:09 pm PST
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spartan04 Friday, January 16th, 2004
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month6 of 7 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
4 years
Similar
Products Used:
Cockers.
Marker Setup: Blazer (vertical feed)
45 Frame x2
Rock Reg.
Nickel Highlights
Drop
Co2 baby!
Recommended
Upgrades:
What I have.
Strengths: Reliability
Accuracy
Quiet (when vented)
Small
Closed Bolt
Read review below for full stats.
Weaknesses: $$$ Expensive $$$
Read review below for full stats.
Review: Pros:

-The Blazer marker looks like it has had the same re-sale value (based on basic black vert. feed body) of $430 over the last five years. (probably b/c it's custom made)
-80 shots per ounce of Co2, that’s 1,280 shots from a 16 oz tank. 12+ shots per cu. in. at 3000 psi HPA…roughly 816+ shots from a 68 ci 3000 psi tank. This is due to the short four way quick ram and the built in Rock regulator.
-2.2 lbs! 15.5 inches long (as for my good old shocker it was 23.5 inches long and weighs in over 10 lbs when fully loaded) The Blazer is so light due to its construction materials which are aircraft grade aluminum and brass with hard anodized, polished paint, and nickel.
-Friendly to Co2, HPA, and N2. Co2 Recommended.
-Works from 20 degrees Fahrenheit (using Co2) to -10 degrees Fahrenheit (using HPA or N2).
-Works in the rain.
-Custom made gun (so it’s rare).
-Closed bolt accuracy.
-Cycling rate clocked at 20 b.p.s (balls per second) which is the fastest a human has been able to pull the trigger. Although it’s capable of cycling up to 30 b.p.s. (Hint it’s name “the Blazer…for blazing fast”) All of this is performed with very little to none shoot down due to the Palmer Rock regulator and Male stabilizer. (I doubt it can cycle 20 b.p.s. and much more doubtfully 30 b.p.s. because it's a two stage trigger but that's what others have said. I'm thinking more realistically you could maybe do 16 b.p.s. and that's pushin' it.)
-Brass 12” barrel with nickel plating and clamp in barrel for accuracy using gelatin paintballs.
-Short trigger pull. Benchmark 45 frame with swing trigger and a 3.75 mm pull. -Autocockers have a 4.00 mm pull.
-Bolt can be removed in under 4 seconds for Ultra-Quick field stripping, making it the easiest marker to clean.
-Said to be the most reliable and low maintenance marker ever made (yes, even more than a Tippmann).
-Easy to clean. Palmer recommends showering with it after a day of play.
-Maintained a 9.9 out of 10.0 for the last 6 years on pbreview.com
-1 year parts and labor warranty (reviews say you won’t need it though, the marker is indestructible).
-Palmer has the reputation for the best customer service in the business (again…custom quality).
-Will turn heads on the field : )



Cons:

-Expensive for a rec player like me (But what do you expect from a custom made marker).
-Very little aftermarket parts available.
-Some people think it is kind of ugly (opinion).
-Not a lot of optional aftermarket upgrades available (none needed though).
-Possibility of short-stroking due to the dual action trigger (as with any autococker).
-If you want it serviced you have to send it to Palmer’s HQ in California.
-Stock trigger pull is sort of heavy (this is solved by the Benchmark 45 trigger frame).
-The stock barrel is loud, get the 12 in. double vented barrel and it makes a world of a difference.
-Overall marker isn’t tinker friendly. Something goes wrong you ship to Cali or void warranty
-It doesn’t come with a Night Vision Thermal Heat-Seeking Auto-Warp Fed Electronic-Laser Milled tricked out Automatic Sniping option.
Conclusion: It's a good marker that can withstand anything you can throw at it. Even stock it is pretty cool. My only objection is the price tag that comes with it....but what do you expect from a custom marker.

Get used to the trigger style so you don't short-stroke it.

Break the regulator in when you get it.

It all comes down to what you prefer. Electros are very popular in today's paintball world. I am very happy with my Blazer. I never feel intimidated by electros now, however they sure are fun to shoot.

I wish Glenn and Craig could send them faster.

Enjoy, worship, and (fondly) love it when you get it.

I wish there was a 9.9
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Friday, January 16th, 2004 at 2:44 pm PST
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jimmynz Friday, January 8th, 2010
Period of
Product Use:
3 years4 of 6 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tippmanns, couple of classic cockers, WGP Sniper
Marker Setup: PPS Blazer, 9 inch dual vented barrel with PPS apex adaptor & apex, male stabilizer, redz grenade asa
Recommended
Upgrades:
Dual vented barrel, male stabilizer. Other than that, you don't need much. Perhaps the apex if you feel you want it, it shoots great with an apex.
Strengths: - Accuracy
- Consistency
- Durability
- Reliability
- Barrel
- Bolt
- EFFICIENCY
- Maintenance
Weaknesses: - Price
- Noise
- EXPOSED BOLT
- Freezes
- R.O.F.
- Ugly
- Detents
- No eyes
Review: Well first up, please bear in mind this is a review from extensive product use. As I write this it's January 2010, I bought it and have used it regularly since January 2007. 3 years. Have used this gun on both CO2 and air.



Strengths, EFFICIENCY! My god... this this is awesome next to a gas hungry CVX valve tippmann. On a full 20oz you'll get somewhere around 1000-1500 shots on a blazer. On a tippmann you'll get more like 500-1000.

The accuracy and consistency are good, though brass barrels are definitely not miles better than any other good aftermarket barrel. You do need a male stabilizer though for good consistency, unregulated the gun spikes a lot on CO2. Durability, this thing is like a tank... you can take it in the shower with you at the end of the day to clean it, in fact, it says to do so in the manual. Maintenance is easy, a few drops of oil in the asa, on the bolt, and ram. Generally reliable, however there are 2 achillies heels with this gun (see below). Upper bolt is good too coz you can pull it out and swab the gun.

Slip fit barrel, though some people won't like this and consider it a weakness. I like it but it does mean you have to use an allen key to change the barrel unless you have a blazer to cocker barrel adaptor.



Weaknesses, EXPOSED BOLT! Much like a tippmann 98... the lower bolt is exposed on this. BAD BAD BAD... get any dirt or sand in there (as I have done more than once) and your gun is now either completely unresponsive... or not cycling correctly until you can get off the field, degass, and pull out the lower bolt assembly for a THOROUGH and DIFFICULT cleaning out. (You have to flush it with tonnes and tonnes of water).

The gun also freezes up on CO2 in the cold. BAD BAD BAD... Palmer owners who live in warm climates like Sacramento will swear they've never had this problem, BUT... you shoot this gun in cold weather on CO2 and it will not cycle correctly, if at all. Similar problem to getting dirt in the bolt. The new synthetic lube supposedly alleviates this... however the difference is minimal/non existence. IT STILL FREEZES UP.

Also, the cocker detends, they are not the greatest... put them too far in and you start wearing out your bolt, too far out and you're double feeding. I've done both. Trigger... the safety switch on mine now will come all the way out (it's not supposed to do that), put this down to wear and tear. Eyes... it has no eyes. Well okay it is an old design of mech gun, but seriously, eyes would have saved me a lot of grief on the field from chopping balls. The breach and upper bolt are a TERRIBLE MESS when it chops.

Expensive, I loved this gun when I got it, but now in 2010... honestly $400 for a basic blazer is too much, not when you can get something like an Invert mini instead. ROF... not very fast. It is fun to shoot as a mech though, it has that very heavy trigger pull cocker feel to it although it's not as easy to short stroke. Lastly, yeah, the gun is loud. But hey it's poppet valve. Even with the dual vented barrel it's still loud. The gun itself seems to eminate the pop.
Conclusion: In January 2007 when I got this, I would have given it a 10 out of 10. Today, I give it 7 out of 10. I do not reccomend this gun to anybody except people who want an oddball oldschool style mech. Ie- the sort of people who like cockers and pumps.

The biggest strength IMO is efficiency, it's amazing, you shoot all day long with a blazer. Biggest weakness is the exposed bolt and the fact it freezes up in the cold. Something many would be owners will be doing since the gun is omni gas capable.

If you want a solid mech you can literally use and abuse, get a tippmann, an A5 or something. The Blazer cannot be used and abused, it has to be looked after. If you want high ROF... get an electro. The Blazer is slow by comparison. Only get this gun if you fall into the quirky cocker type owner of category.
Rating:
7 out of 10
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motomut Saturday, May 10th, 2003
Period of
Product Use:
3 months3 of 3 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Typhoon: similar action, but blazer is lighter & faster.
Various Cockers including an E Blade: Blazer is lighter & much more compact, cycles faster than cockers except for my custom E Blade.
Marker Setup: Blazer with vertical feed, 45 grip w/double trigger, palmer stabilizer, fluted 12" nickel plated brass palmer barrel, drop frwd w/on-off, VL Revolution.
Typhoon: Double trigger & pro job, Palmer stabilizer, muzzle break, VL Revolution.
Custom E Blade w/Palmer pneumatics (micro rock & stabilizer), X-10 Drop frwd w/on-off, , VL Evo II.
Recommended
Upgrades:
Go with the 45 grip, double trigger, a Palmer stabilizer, and the 12"or 14" fluted barrel. A motorized loader is a must to keep up with the ROF.
Strengths: Consistent. Compact. Not prone to short stroke. Accurate. Low maintenance.
Weaknesses: No ball detection system (but rarely would need it).
Review: I've been using Palmer products for quite awhile and own one of the first 100 typhoons made ( the marker , originally a sheridan single feed paintball rifle, has been through every modification available from PPS). I was very pleased with the performance and low maintenance requirements of the marker for many years. For a time, I stepped away from the game and only recently came back to it a couple of years ago. When I returned, I was blown away by the electro markers. Having been seduced by the speed and light weight of the new electro's, I ran the table from spyders to bushmasters & timmys, to an ultra trick custom E Blade. It was nice to shoot fast, but I was'nt thrilled about the high maintenance and often found myself relying on my back up marker, that wonderful old typhoon. I live about an hour away from PPS so I decided to go in and see if there were any updates available for it. I had the pro trigger job done and the double trigger added which made a significant difference in the feel and speed of the marker - but while there, they had me shoot a Blazer. No sales pitch needed---SOLD! I've had the marker out every weekend since and this thing is AWESOME! I've chopped a couple of balls thru about 7cases of paint, but it took less than 10 seconds to clean due to the design of the bolt, pin, and ram - snap out, pull a swab thru, snap in - that's it, there is no block to line up or pin to misplace. Accuracy is unmatched and enhanced by the nearly nonexistent motion during cycling, I've been able to shoot through very small gaps ( if you can shoot out from it, a Blazer can shoot back into it). The Blazer is also quite compact and, unlike other mechanical pneumatics, all lines are internal - built into the body, no need for LP hose. Maintenance has consisted of cleaning with warm water and a mild soap, a few drops of oil in the ASA & bolt o-rings, and minor adjustments to the primary & low pressure regs. The regs have now taken seat and no longer need adjustment, it's so consistent I don't even have to adjust the velocity anymore. The marker has never gone down, is unbelievably accurate & consistent, very compact, and has a decent ROF. I'm so pleased that I've begun to sell off my other markers on eBay.
Conclusion: If you are a cocker fanatic and don't care for the current trend toward electric controlled mechanical operation, you need to check out this marker. It is lighter, more compact and attractive, shoots more consistent , smoother, faster, and is less prone to short stroking than even the most modified cocker (E blade conversion excluded). And all that for less than $600.00 An electro option with some kind of breach sensor would make this unarguably the best marker money could buy.
Rating:
10 out of 10
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TheECP Tuesday, February 26th, 2008
Period of
Product Use:
1 year2 of 2 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
4 years
Similar
Products Used:
(mechanicals I've used)

Automags
'Cockers
Tippmanns
Spyders
Marker Setup: PPS Blazer (green)
10" .689 matte nickel plated brass barrel
Palmer's Stabilizer
12v Revvy
PE 68/4500
Recommended
Upgrades:
Dual vented Brass barrel in .685
Palmer's Stabilizer
Strengths: Small, Consistent, Reliable, Easy Maintenence.
Weaknesses: Possibility of Short-stroking, Heavy Price, "Slow"
Review: APPEARANCE 4/5

The anno is very nice and shiny, though there are a few marks on the bottom of the body from sealing the air passages. Other than that, it's a very clean design, even though may not be the slickest looking thing. I personally love the looks


PERFORMANCE 5/5

The PPS Blazer shoots like a dream. Out of the box it may require some tuning to the rock LPR and the stab regulator (if you have one) but it's rather straight forward and well described in your owner's manual. Once that's out of the way, this thing will shoot a consistent +/- 5 even with BAD paint. And slightly better as your reg breaks in.

As far as accuracy goes, the PPS brass barrel is easily one of the best barrels out there. With wedgits (comes standard) you shouldn't have to worry about roll-outs (This is a closed bolt marker). Stock barrels are unported and makes your Blazer rather loud, but in a good way. When using good paint (such as Draxxus Gold, or RPS Marbalizer) You will be ball on ball. Of course the major factor in accuracy is good paint.

The trigger feels very nice, much like an upgraded 'cocker trigger. It's nice and snappy, and it isn't very short, but it's not long at the same time, it feels just right. The only "problem" is that if you're not experienced with 2 staged trigger pulls, you may short stroke every now and then. But it wont usually lead to a chop, so there's nothing to worry about. Just practice getting used to the trigger, and you wont short stroke anymore. With this trigger I'm able to pull a consistent 8bps or so.

You'll be very happy with the way this baby shoots, trust me.


RELIABILITY 5/5

This is definitely one of the most reliable markers on the market. This thing is built like a tank. I've used it to break my fall, I've accidentally dropped it a time or two, and not even a scratch.

As you may or may not know, it is an autococker in a sense, and it has all the same kind of parts, BUT the parts that really screw 'cockers up (the exposed airlines) are not a problem at all with the Blazer. Instead, nothing is exposed and all the air lines are actually air passages milled in the receiver! so no leaks or anything like that

And maintenance? What's this? I've never heard of it. Or at least you don't need to have heard of it to take care of the Blazer After a day of play, if it's rather dirty all you need to do is soak the whole thing in the sink (Or take it with you in the shower, yes the manual actually says this!) And then shake dry it, gas it up shoot it a few times to get the water out, then de-gass it. Then all you need to do is put a few drops of oil on the bolt o-rings, the hammer and behind it (accessible through a slot on the side, no disassembly required!) and then some drops down the asa, gas it up take your barrel off, and shoot a few times and your Blazer is lubed

What I just described is almost excessive maintenance, because it isn't necessary to do it that way.

The Blazer will never chop on you if you have a good loader, but if you do get paint in your breach, take the bolt out is as easy as pulling a pin and sliding it out, you can even do this during the game

I think the Blazer's only weak spot is where the barrel is attached. It is a slip fit barrel, and then you clamp it (with an allen screw, or an upgradeable knob)
The only reason it's a weak spot is because Brass isn't the hardest metal, and over tightening or stress on the barrel may damage the barrel.

So just don't take a core sample of the earth with your barrel when diving, hehe. But that's pretty much with any Marker, lol.

Other than that, you shouldn't have to Time your Blazer very often at all. Some people have had there Blazers for many years and have never had to time it. But if you do, Palmer's will do it for you as it's not as easy as it is with a normal 'cocker. I personally haven't had to time mine yet, it shoots just fine


VALUE 4/5

The Blazer is a great bang for your buck, depending on what your ideal "bang" is. If shooting speed is an important factor, then you should look elsewhere because you can find nice electros for the same price.

But if you want one of the most reliable nicest shooting mechanical markers, then look no further the Blazer is your answer. It will definitely shoot like the $700+ you'll spend on it.


OTHER MENTIONS

The feedneck isn't the best, as it's not adjustable (but comes with these stupid white knobs to hold hoppers in place) It doesn't bother me really, because I just put tape around the feedneck of my Revvy and it stays in place perfectly. Though there are mods for clamping feednecks that you can figure out how to do online, google is your friend.
Conclusion: This is easily one of the best Mechanical Markers out there. (I like it better than any mag I've shot) And it should always treat you well, as it has with me. I love my Blazer :)
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Tuesday, February 26th, 2008 at 2:52 pm PST
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frontsniper Tuesday, December 30th, 2003
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month2 of 2 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Typhoon, 2k3 WGP autocockers, and many other cockers
Marker Setup: Palmer Blazer #BZ2019 Centerfeed, benchmark 45 frame w/ PTTJ, teardrop drop foward, nickel vented barrel, male stabalizer, derlin bolt.
Recommended
Upgrades:
PTTJ/ new frame, vented barrel (big difference between stock barrel), stabalizer
Strengths: Closed bolt, small pull, hard to shortstroke, shoots as fast as you pull.
Weaknesses: not alot of upgrades, only shop is in California( not a weakness for me though)
Review: When i got this i was a little skeptical of how it shoots, so i put about 10 cans on top of a big cardboard box. I moved about 100 feet away from the targets ( from end to end of my backyard) and took aim. I used a 20 oz. Co2 tank for gas power. The great thing is that they recommend using Co2, so thats a plus for everyone. I used RPS big balls for paint. Since i bought it used, i had upgrades such as male stab and a nickel vented barrel. i hit all 10 cans, dead center! i was truly impressed. Next, i put up a target with a 45-pound olympic weight behind it to keep it standing. I shot as fast as i can, and it shot every single one on the dot. I was using an Evolution II as my hopper so it can keep up with my trigger-happy self. Now, i attempted to shortstroke it to see how fast i could shoot it through. I tried and tried, but i couldn't do it. I finally did it after about 1000 shots attempted. I stood away aobut 50 feet, and shot. As i shot it, i can see the giant wing of the balls, but with about 10 shots, it shot clean again. I decided to bring it to the field a couple of days later. When i shot through the chronogeaph, it hit 315 on first shot, so i turned it down about a quarter turn. It shot 284,284,285. Talk about consistant! We walked out to the woodsball field and when everyone was set, the whistle blew. I bolted up the middle, and i saw about 5 guys 100 feet from me. I just thought it was target practice, so i pegged each one in the goggles. While i ran, i heard a distant yell, a guy i shot out yelled "dude! What are you shooting!?" I heard it and just took it with a smirk on my face. at the end of the day i had shot a case of paint, and i havent chopped since. I apologized to some of the guys i over shot out there. But all in all, i was very satisfied with the performance of the blazer. Now to this day, i play at SC village in Corona, and Valley Thunder at Galt, both in California. I play with a team called Blazed, along with my other friends with Palmer Blazers.
Conclusion: This gun is one of the best markers in the world (in my opinion). This gun is basically a modified autococker. I would reccomend one to anyone, just buy it used for more bang for your buck.
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Tuesday, December 30th, 2003 at 3:06 pm PST
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Sir_Brass Friday, February 20th, 2004
Period of
Product Use:
6 months2 of 3 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
3 years
Similar
Products Used:
Autococker with hinge blade trigger. I was only borrowing it, so I don't much more than that.
Marker Setup: Pre-1k PPS Blazer (BZ838):
-matched black powder coated 12" vented PPS brass barrel
-Male stabalizer regulator
-5" shocktech drop rail
-KAPP on/off dovetail rail ASA
-black 32* grips
-2x benchmark grip frame
-black anno blade trigger
-anti-siphon 20 oz. CO2 tank (since the blazer runs off of Co2 much better than on HPA)
Recommended
Upgrades:
benchmark frame
matched barrel
barrel venting
stabalizer or dual stabalizers, depending on if you'll be using CO2 or HPA
Strengths: trigger pull, stability of shooting platform, small, very light, very consistant, quiet
Weaknesses: cost, must be sent into PPS for major servicing
Review: I can't really say more than has already been said. The blazer is the SWEETEST gun I've ever gotten to shoot. Only downside performance-wise is that no ball will survive coming out the barrel if there's a barrel break uncleaned (and I mean unswabbed. not just dry firing to clear out some paint), but the plus is that rarely if ever (when using good fitting or smaller AND high quality paint in moderate or warmer weather (50* and up)) will it break or chop. You have to almost consciously get this baby to chop a ball.

As to accuracy . . . incredible. with a matched barrel, I'm shooting ropes where others with their fancy schmancy electros shoot clouds comparatively. The blazer is also extremely fast. The trigger pull is very shoot, smooth, and INCREDIBALLY sexy.

Also, this thing is WAY compact. yes, it works like a cocker, but where a cocker has tons of free space and stupidly places the pneus out front and in the open begging to be shot, the blazer's air passages are all internalized and milled INTO the body. this makes a marker that is only 15" in length with a 12" barrel placed on it (barrel goes 2" into the body). This also makes for a very light gun as well.

Simply put, this gun has put me out of the so-called "paintball arms race". I have NO desire for another gun OVER this one. Sure, I'd like others, but not to replace the blazer, definately not to replace the blazer (unless it's another blazer).
Conclusion: The BEST mech semi on the market hands down. Worth EVERY PENNY spent on it. Best gun I've ever shot or owned. She's a keeper.
Rating:
10 out of 10
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