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Kingman Spyder MR1 Reviews

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Kingman Spyder MR1
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Number of Reviews: 261
Average Rating: 8.7 / 10
Manufacturer Website: Click here
Suggested Retail Price: $90

Manufacturer DescriptionSubscribe to Reviews on this Product - Edit this Product Listing
The MR1 will take a beating and keep on firing! The slide out pull pin, field strippable bolt, and full-length stock (optional) make the MR1 an easily operated and highly accurate scenario marker with military resilience and stability. This semi-auto marker won't rust even when you're trekking through the wettest terrain, and you?ll never need to worry about batteries because there aren?t any electronic parts!
Product Availability 
The Kingman Spyder MR1 is newer, so it should be commonly available, both new and used.
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Biopledgiance Wednesday, September 26th, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
6 months658 of 668 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tippmann 98
Marker Setup: Spyder MR2
Special Ops Commando Stock
Red Dot Scope
And
Spyder MR1 Stock
Recommended
Upgrades:
Plastic Elbow broke many times. Keep a spare one, or three.
The MR3 Stock
Remote Kit
Strengths: Tough!
Cool Looking
Angle Feed Neck
It's a Spyder

Weaknesses: Open holes (2) to Bolt.
May be loud for some wussies.
Silver under plating.
Review: This gun is awesome. Spyders entry level woodsball gun. It's main competitor in my opinion is the Tippmann 98C. To compare the two, I found them both the same, and the only bad part of them both was the open bolt, which attracts dirt and grime. Easily fixed by cleaning and maintaning. For the 98 you can buy the Cocker Pin cover.
The main reason this wins over the 98 is price, $80 to $135 on average online.
The MR1 is half a pound heavier if I remember correctly, and it changes nothing for me, it builds that much more muscle, and if you complain of 1/2 a pound, stick to your Invert Mini's, you wussies. (Which is an awesome gun btw) The MR1 is a tank, just as tough as the 98 and just as reliable. Its a gun you play with and beat, throw under your bed until next weekend and it keeps going. Great Gun.
Cleaning the MR1 is the same as any other Spyder, remove the pin let the bolt fall out, stick your swab in there and clean the dirt out, wipe the bolt and put it back in. To do the same on a 98 to get just as thorough cleaning requires unscrewing it and halving it. (We did it, don't argue) Although neither gun chops very often, cheap paint or nasty luck is about it. The stock is a plus, but can get in the way, fixed by either removing it, or getting the stock from an MR3 or even an after market one. Removing it is fine, because on-gun air (12oz) suits this gun well. Remote is awesome when using the (a) stock. Much better. When it comes to the materials, the 98 had alot more plastic on it, but the metal didn't scratch and leave silver lining to show, although its hard to on the MR1 and I have never broken plastic parts on a gun before, so the idea of plastic=bad can't truely be a factor in normal to mildy abusive play.
A plus on the MR1 is the bottem line hose is covered in a thick rubber/plastic sleeve cover thing. Very durable and further protects the braids. The front grip is very nice, you can set your hand on it comfortabley in any position, while the 98 felt akward to hold properly, forcing your elbow out a foot, exposing yourself, although if you don't care about it feeling akward as heck, you can place your hand differently. Buy it, get a few extra detents, a couple elbows and some gun lube and your set.

*Accuracy

The gun shoots hard and fast and the barrel is good. If more accuracy is wanted, there is a plethora of Spyder Thread Barrels on the market. Have at it!

Please, don't forget to mention if it was helpful or not!
Conclusion: Get this gun if you want an entry level or extra gun. Just as good as a 98 but cheaper.
Some compare this to an A-5 with comments like, not an A-5 BUT... duh it's not an A-5 it's an entry level $100 gun. A-5 is one level up, you can't compare them. It's like a review for a Honda Civic, you can't talk about how bad it compares to an S2000. Wrong level. I give it a 9 because nothing is perfect.
Rating:
9 out of 10Last edited on Sunday, November 2nd, 2008 at 10:41 pm PST
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CHCKilgore Friday, March 24th, 2006
Period of
Product Use:
1 year187 of 193 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
2 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tippmann 98 Custom - more upgradeable, but more expensive with necessary upgrades
Marker Setup: Main: Tiberius Arms T-9 Covert
PMI remote line
OPSGEAR FoT sight

Backup: Spyder MR1
16" Custom Products One-Piece Classic barrel
PMI remote line
Recommended
Upgrades:
Remote Line
New elbow
New barrel
E-Grip & Electronic Loader - if you are trigger happy
Strengths: Stock included
Nice mil-sim look
Rugged design
Price is right
Weaknesses: Brittle elbow - $5 fix
Weaver rail is too short to be useful
Review: I recently bought an MR1 for a backup/girlfriend marker and I was very impressed. The marker has a very solid aluminum frame and a nice mil-sim look. Out of the box, the MR1 comes with a solid stock, a decent barrel, a clear elbow, a barrel plug and a few small replacement parts.

The paint job on the gun is flat black which is great for staying concealed in the woods. The feed is offset on the right hand side which makes sighting smooth and natural. You will need to invest in a more rugged elbow because the one included with the marker is very brittle and breaks easily. The stock barrel is fairly accurate, but if you have the money, a BT Apex or a 14" J&J would be a worthwhile upgrade.

Unfortunately if you enjoy using the sights on your markers, the stock sights are nonexistant because the top cocking bolt blocks your view. Another downer for mil-sim/woodsballers is the lack of a decent weaver rail. The rail that is provided is just too short to be useful. It might be possible to find a short-based weaver rail that is raised to avoid the bolt or if you are crafty you can make a custom rail to solve this problem.

I have put about 500 rounds through the MR1 so far and haven't had one chop yet. Luckily if I do have a break, the MR1 is easy to disassemble for cleaning. Aside from a few minor issues, the Spyder MR1 is a great marker for any woodsballer on a budget or anyone looking for a nice reliable backup marker. To upgrade a Tippmann 98 Custom to match the MR-1 would cost nearly $100 more than the MR1. Color me impressed!

UPDATE: I have played 5 games and put around 4-5,000 rounds through the marker with only 5 breaks. The ball detent is still in great shape although I ordered a new one from Kingman just in case. The MR1 has proven to be a reliable and rugged marker. Hopefully we'll see some marker specific upgrades in the near future like a raised sight rail that actually fits and clears the bolt.

UPDATE: I recently ditched my A-5 for the Spyder MR1. I added a 16" inch Custom Products One-Piece Classic barrel and my MR1 shoots like a dream. I have less problems with cleaning (Cyclone feed and flatline barrel are beasts to clean) with no loss in performance. A decent electronic loader is definitely a worthwhile upgrade for consistent feeding. After about 20 games and thousands of rounds fired, my ball detent is still in excellent shape with no noticeable wear.

UPDATE: I have finally found a decent fix for the gimpy sight rail on the MR1. Using a set of 1" Weaver Quad Lock scope rings and a set of Weaver Marlin 336 scope bases, I have created an offset (mounted at roughly 45 degrees to the left) scope mount that clears the bolt and the stock (with the help of a raised weaver rail). This solution cost me roughly $15 and it works beautifully. I have about 2 inches of clearance between my mask and my stock. In order for this setup to work properly, you will also need a raised sight rail or see-thru scope mounts to ensure mask clearance. Once you have your sight rail attached, you can mount your favorite scope or sight system!
Conclusion: The Spyder MR1 great marker for any woodsballer looking for something a little different. The MR1 is ready to rock right out of the box and with a few minor upgrades, the MR1 becomes a highly accurate marker. I give this marker a solid 9 out of 10.
Rating:
9 out of 10Last edited on Sunday, January 21st, 2007 at 9:02 pm PST
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TheLastBrunnenG Friday, January 6th, 2006
The accuracy of this review is disputed. Please see discussion on the comments page.
Period of
Product Use:
Only tested101 of 145 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Spyder Xtra, TL-R, and Rodeo, JT Excellerator 3.5e and TAC-5, Tippmann 98 and A5, more...
Marker Setup: * Spyder TL-R with a new Phat feedneck and PMI Razzor 14" barrel.
* Spyder Sonix Pro with a new ACPball feedneck and a 12" J&J Precision barrel
* Game Face Vexor Eye with a custom ACPball delrin bolt
Recommended
Upgrades:
1. Feedneck / elbow.
2. Barrel, but not necessary.
3. Red dot dight and other decorative junk.
Strengths: Slick styling, simple yet effective design
Weaknesses: Cheap plastic feedneck elbow. Lack of volumizer or expansion chamber may hurt CO2 users.
Review: 11 FEB 2006 - Added a comment under the Detent section, changed rating from 8 to 7.

The MR1 is the electronic MR2's little brother, but it's an odd design. It's not as scenario-heavy as the JT TAC-5 but it's not as easy to use or as well-equipped as lower-cost mechanical markers like the Xtra or TLX. The rundown:

BARREL - 12" ported barrel with no muzzle break. Matte black so there's no glare to give away your position. Not very quietest, but that's normal for Spyders. Good internal finish, and better accuracy than average for a stock barrel. There is no volumizer shroud like on the MR2, so replacement barrels will be easy to add. Looks like a 2-piece but isn't.

FOREGRIP / EXPANSION CHAMBER - Foregrip is metal and vertical, shaped off the old AMG molds. It's just a gas-through foregrip, so there's no expansion chamber. No way to add a regulator since there's no front block to replace - the foregrip bolts directly into the body of the gun. Grip is a hair loose even with the bolts tightened.

VOLUMIZER - None. The body is capped where a volumizer would go.

TRIGGER / FRAME - Standard mechanical metal Kingman trigger frame. Trigger pull is 3/4" and not adjustable. Frame is all metal with very nice rubber grips. Safety is standard crossbolt for mechanical markers. Trigger has a little side play and is squeaky.

DROP / ASA - ASA works well enough and has an internal filter. Drop is short but angled. BIG HOORAY: The MR series uses IN-LINE SCREWS ON THE DROP FORWARD!!! No more offset Kingman-only holes! The line is black-coated stainless braided line.

DETENT - Integrated under the angled feed port's braces. Not a standard Kingman left-side ball-bearing. *** EDIT 11 FEB 2006 - This will cost the MR-1 a rating point. I played with the MR1 today, and through 4 games it successfully fired maybe 20 balls out of 500. The problem was the detent - the bolt sheared it clean off! The MRs use a tiny rubber finger as a detent and the MR1's aluminum bolt cut it right in half. It began double and triple feeding, which any marker with no detent could be expected to do. I didn't discover this until much later, when I got home to disassemble the marker (the detent is installed underneath the feedport plate). Why, oh why, did Kingman stop using their standard left-side ball-bearing detent??? ***

BODY - Minimal milling. Feedneck is an angled 45-degree stub with a cheap plastic adapter/elbow. Field stripping is a standard Kingman pull pin (held by a ball bearing, not a cotter pin). Body is all metal, but the marker is no heavier than a TL-R. The top of the marker comes with built-in 7/8" Weaver rails, interrupted by the feedneck and cocking knob. There are no bottom or side rails. Body is uniformly matte black with a tough finish; the cocking knob is also black.

STOCK - Shared with the MR2. Stock is open-frame skeletal design but is very stable and tough. Makes the already heavy MR1 even heavier, but it's worth it. The stock insertion is o-ringed so the marker may perform even better with it than without.

INTERNALS - Top-cocking marker (stacked-tube blowback) with an open rear end (unless the stock is attached). Internals may be shared with the TLX, TL-R, and Sonix Value / Sonix Pro, but I'm not 100% certain yet. Bolt is a standard Kingman aluminum venturi bolt. Interior finish is excellent. Velocity is adjusted via a rear set screw, not by the old Kingman thumbwheel.
Conclusion: Marker feels good but it's not as well-equipped as lower-end markers - it's basically a dressed-up Victor or a stripped Sonix Value. The finish is good but the short rail (the main attraction for scenario / milsim buffs) is barely useful. CO2 users may be hurt by the lack of expansion chamber and volumizer. It's a good, solid marker, but only if you're dead-set on a mechanical or really need a blasted-black paint job. Maybe if someone added the e-frame from a $60 refurb Imagine then this would be a contender. Otherwise it's an 8 out of 10, and I'm generous because I'm a Kingman geek.
Rating:
7 out of 10Last edited on Saturday, February 11th, 2006 at 8:50 pm PST
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ppppoway Sunday, April 2nd, 2006
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month85 of 92 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
3 years
Similar
Products Used:
pretty much every spyder there is.. they are all alike in performance exept for the higher end ones such as the elctra or fenix
Marker Setup: Tippmann A-5 with all the fancy crap on it such as a remote stock, e grip and all the other stuff other tippmann owners have
Recommended
Upgrades:
Expansion chamber
Better barrel of course
Elbow
drop forward
Bolt, perhaps an anti chop
remote










Strengths: Cool looking
very durable
something diiferent for noobs with 98 customs
really sick grip panels
Weaknesses: No way to put a volumizer on it
elbow (cheap fix)
not too many upgrades
Review: I ordered this gun for 120 and Im very satisfied with my purchase. I just started playing woodsball and this gun really lives up to its expectations. The first thing I did was look at the ball detent because some said it could be easily chopped off. I looks pretty durable so I think maybe if i put a new bolt in, it will not chop it off. i put the stock on and it has a really nice feel to it. the gun with a new barrel should be an ok sniper so to say gun. The gas through fore grip is kinda fat but is very grippy.

Alright, now to shoot this beast. I loaded this baby with air and paint and went in my back yard to lay some cheepo paint on my fence. this gun is not as heavy as a tippmann so that is a total plus. I stood, I'm guessing mayby 50 to 60 feet and this gun was making probly 5 square inches of paint. This accuracy test probly didn't turn ou the way I thought it would because i was using year old brass eagle wild streak wet paintballs.I'm sure with maybey a sight this gun could shoot more acuratly but its almaost imposible to do because of the very short accessoriy rail.

I took this gun to the rec ball ball field and I pretty much owned. Even the guys with good gear respected me for not buying a victor or an tl series gun. I havent seen anyone else with this gun and I thi it should stay that way before kingman turns back into the company were all the gun have no individuallity. This gun is fast and very easy to use. Just remember your buying a spyder.
Conclusion: this kicks bootey and for the price I reccomend it to a scenario or a rec ball player. Most people think this gun is heavy but its as light as most mechanicles out there.
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Tuesday, April 4th, 2006 at 5:05 pm PST
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JamesDean5150 Sunday, August 20th, 2006
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month68 of 72 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tippmann A-5 Special Ops SD6 Version with 12" J&J Ceramic w/50mm Red Dot Scope
AutoCocker Trilogy Comp SF (select fire) Matte Black finish
Marker Setup: Tippmann A-5 Special Ops SD6 Version with 12" J&J Ceramic w/50mm Red Dot Scope
Recommended
Upgrades:
An offset sight rail and scope (the gun is dead nuts accurate without, but if you want to increase your first shot kill rate...)
Strengths: This gun is crazy out of the box!
Accurate
Fast
Love's almost all paint
Weaknesses: Grips wear the moment you touch them.
Stock vibrates loose.
Stock prevents bolt removal
Review: This gun is the best MilSim bargain on the market. I have nearly $800 into my A-5 setup and this gun gives it a real run for it's money. Almost refuses to chop paint. The stock barrel is SUPER accurate. The sound scares people (including me when I let a friend borrow it and it was shooting at me!) The gun feels alot like the H&K UMP 45. VERY IMPRESSIVE. I bought the new Matte Black AutoCocker Trilogy Comp SF and will be selling it. The MR1 is my backup of choice, and that's only because I already have so much into my A-5. If not, the MR1 would be my primary weapon! THE GUN JUST KICKS BUTT! The problems that some people are talking about must just be flukes because my MR1 rocked out of the box with absolutely NO real problems. Yes, the grips wear the moment you touch them, and yes, the stock is in the way for removing the bolt (easily fixed by picking up a butterfly head bolt and stacking some washers. Yes, the stock does seem to vibrate loose quite easily, even with the chinsy lock washer provided. But again, easily fixed by using a real lock washer plus loctite. There aren't alot of mods for the gun out that I've found, but really there aren't any needed. Different stocks are available, and some nifty barrel shrouds. When I bought the gun I had plans to immediately pick up a J&J ceramic (I've have one on my A-5 and on my old AutoCocker and absolutely LOVE those barrels, best bang for the buck for sure) but the stock barrel on the MR1 is SOOOOOOO good it really seemed like a waste of money. Yes, the stock barrel is a little loud, but I kinda dig that, coupled with the fact that I've thrown all kinds of paint through the gun and it has happily shot it all.
Conclusion: This gun is the best value in the MilSim paintball world. At $100 you would do yourself a disservice to purchase anything else, regardless if it's your primary weapon or a backup. I'm giving the gun a 10, because of the overall performance, because of the increadible value and because I LOVE IT! The best $100 I've spent in a looooooong time!
Rating:
10 out of 10
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Lil' C Thursday, April 13th, 2006
The accuracy of this review is disputed. Please see discussion on the comments page.
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month63 of 72 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
6 months
Similar
Products Used:
Tippmann A-5
Diablo Mongoose II
Marker Setup: Secondary Marker:
Kingman Spyder MR1 with accessory stock
Spyder ESP electronic frame (semi-automatic, 3-shot burst, and full-automatic modes)Fireball Mountain Delrin double trigger
Scenario Dreams 25g light trigger switch
Dye Sticky grips
Lapco drop forward, gas-thru foregrip (2-stage EC), and grip frame adapter
Custom macroline air setup with Lapco vertical adapter
Custom Products on-off ASA with de-gas
Alamo City Paintball ringless Delrin bolt
Alamo City Paintball ringless composite Delrin/steel striker (lightened)
Armson 8" rifled barrel
Halo Backman TSA LCD hopper (230-round capacity) with Extreme Rage elbow

Primary Marker:
Tippmann A-5 with E-Grip
Dead On Products Delrin front bolt and power tube
BT Paintball rear velocity adjuster
Empire 7-pc barrel kit
Opsgear Fast On Target post sight
Ricochet R-5 hopper
Dye Throttle 70CI 4500PSI HPA tank
Recommended
Upgrades:
Basic Upgrades:
Empire 7-pc barrel kit for Spyder
Alamo City Paintball ringless Delrin bolt
Alamo City Paintball ringless composite Delrin/steel striker (lightened)
Dye Sticky grips

Advanced Upgrades:
Spyder ESP electronic frame (semi-automatic, 3-shot burst, and full-automatic modes
Fireball Mountain Delrin double trigger
Scenario Dreams 25g light trigger switch
Scenario Dreams T-Board with T-Chip upgrade
Strengths: Excellent value
Complete right out of the box
Good-looking
TOUGH!!
Light
Dependable
Upgradable
Weaknesses: Loud as @#%$!
Difficult to mount a usable sight
Accuracy improves with aftermarket barrel
Review: I bought my first MR1 for my stepson right after they came out. I wanted to get him a reliable dedicated woodsball gun that cost less than a Tippmann A-5 and didn't require any batteries. There was no alternative that even came close to the MR1, which I got from Paintball Outlet for $109.

This is an superb basic mechanical marker right out of the box. The feel and finish are excellent. It is light in the hand yet solid, and once you screw on the barrel and stock and attach a cheap gravity hopper, you are ready to air it up and shoot. The MR1 carries nicely and rolls to the shoulder with ease for efficient woodsball-style snapshots. The quality and fieldworthiness of the gun are immediately evident. Because it's a Spyder, its simple construction is intuitive and user-friendly. A complete novice can field-strip and rebuild this gun in a minute -- and actually understand how it works.

Side by side with an A-5, the benchmark for woodsball guns, the MR1 looks and feels every bit as rugged. They both look like you could use 'em to drive nails. The flat black finish is sufficiently hard to stand up to rough play and dragging through rocks, mud, and tree trunks, and there are no superfluous holes or milled openings to collect grime or invite dirt into the internals.

The MR1 did its job for my stepson. It worked reliably with minimal care or maintenance, and it let him save his tournament gun (and its expensive, trouble-prone hopper) for the airball field.

I was so impressed with the MR1, when I needed to replace our "guest gun" I immediately bought another MR1, this time for $99 from Action Villiage. It has become my backup marker when I don't use my trusty A-5 -- and it definitely holds its own!

I got a cheap ESP 3-mode electronic trigger frame for the new MR1, along with a Delrin blade-style two-finger trigger and an ultralight 25-gram switch. With Dye Sticky grips (the stock grips have a great look and feel, but they look worn way too quickly), the upgraded electronic trigger frame took cost me a just a little more than the marker itself, and I now have a real hair trigger with 3-shot burst and full auto modes. The gun shoots perfectly on full auto with a Halo TSA e-loader. I added a gas-through foregrip and an on-off ASA, and now my buddy uses it for suppression fire in the Broadsword position on our woodsball squad when we go out to play most weekends. It also allows a nice, fast two-finger walk for high ROF in semi-auto mode. The gun handles particularly nicely on remote.

If you upgrade your MR1 with an e-frame, upgrading the internals helps the gun actually keep up with the trigger trips it is receiving. I installed a ringless Delrin bolt and a lightened striker from Alamo City Paintball to help increase the cyclic rate on the cheap. The electronic and internal upgrades to the MR1 are less than the difference between the MR1 and the MR2 MSRPs, and the MR1 allows you to use the full range of Sypder-threaded barrels out there, unlike the MR2.

On the occasional chop under sustained full-automatic fire, the MR1 is easy to shoot through. I have yet to get the bolt stuck for any reason, either before or after I installed the aftermarket bolt. I had heard some complaints about the stock bolt shearing off the stock ball detent, so I replaced mine with a black rubber detent from a Bob Long Intimidator as a preventive measure.

The standard 12" muzzle brake barrel is serviceable, but I recommend an aftermarket barrel for improved accuracy. I use an 8" Armson rifled barrel that I got on the Pro-Team Products website; it's great for most paint, although for small-bore paintballs I switch to a .687 or .684 back with a 10" front from my Empire kit.

My only real design beef with the MR1 is that it ought to come with a raised sight rail like its big brother, the MR2. The line of the butt stock is such that it exits high on the receiver and provides no goggle clearance, and options for raising and/or offsetting a sight rail are difficult to find and nearly as expensive as the gun itself -- which is a shame on a marker designed with an offest feed neck and a clear sight picture.

Like all open-bolt blowback markers, this Spyder is LOUD! Full auto fire is VERY LOUD!! Full auto with a really short barrel (8" or less) is EXTREMELY LOUD!!! But I play Dagger, so I don't need no stinkin' quiet paintball gun. If you are looking for a sniper rifle for under $100, keep looking...
Conclusion: The Spyder MR1 is a truly value-laden paintball marker right out of the box, a joy to shoot in stock configuration the day you get it. Even better, it is an exquisite platform for some affordable upgrades that will make it extremely playable for a range of woodsballers without breaking the bank. I don't know of a better marker for under $100.

I'm giving it an 8, but that's a VERY strong 8, with potential to be a super-fun gun and a respectable force on any woodsball field.
Rating:
8 out of 10Last edited on Tuesday, May 2nd, 2006 at 1:24 am PST
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xx47xx Friday, December 23rd, 2005
Period of
Product Use:
Only tested47 of 59 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
2 years
Similar
Products Used:
E-99
Imagine
Inferno
Marker Setup: Gold Smart Parts ION
CP Regulator
12" Dye Excel
Eclipse QEV
48/3000 Crossfire
Shocktech clamping feedneck
Recommended
Upgrades:
Barrel
Trigger
Hopper
Strengths: Sturdy
Cheap
Fast
Nice feel
Weaknesses: I didn't find any
Review: Tested this gun out the other day at my local field, because they just got one yesterday. I took it to the chrono and it was really nice. It was pretty fast and accurate with nothing upgraded. One thing i liked about the gun was that it had a nice feel to it. The top cocking is better than previous spyders i have used. Only had one chop through 200 rounds.
Conclusion: Overall nice gun, great gun for a starter or a serious scenario player.
Rating:
9 out of 10
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trooper67 Friday, April 13th, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
6 months37 of 48 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
4 years
Similar
Products Used:
spyder xtra
Marker Setup: MR1, 20oz, 14'in barrel
Recommended
Upgrades:
barrel, feed neck
Strengths: Strong, cheep, easy to upgrade
Weaknesses: Nothing really
Review: This gun is good for people who are just starting, or if you are looking to up grade.
The MR1, MR2(only tested), MR3(only tested) are awsome guns for woodsball.I have tryed other guns and nothing compares to spyders. The only reason i'm giving this gun
a 10 because it will chop one paintball out of 200, sometimes not even.....other than that there is nothing wrong with it
Conclusion: This is the gun to get if you are a woodsball player
Rating:
10 out of 10Last edited on Monday, May 28th, 2007 at 11:46 am PST
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benthehunter Saturday, April 14th, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
1 year35 of 38 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
1 year
Similar
Products Used:
tippman 98c, viewloader brawler, brass eagle marauder, paradox
Marker Setup: Kingman mr1, pmi razor barrel, viewloader hopper, brass eagle 20 oz co2.
Recommended
Upgrades:
electronic hopper
new grip
new barrel
Strengths: Accuracy
Comfortable
Looks cool
Weaknesses: Heavy
The mount is short
Grip wears out quickly
Review: This gun is the best gun I have shot so for. it easily beat the tippman 98c in accuracy.
I shot at a tree from 70 ft away and it shot within a 6 in circle. but no gun is perfect, the grip wears out quickly and its a little loud with the stock barrel(About the same as the tippman 98c). if you shoot to fast without an electronic hopper balls will chop easy. I havn't had any pops with balls while I was shooting about 2bps. This is why I want a faster hopper.
Conclusion: I reccomend this to anybody that doesnt want to spend too much money and wants an accurate paintball gun.
Rating:
9 out of 10Last edited on Saturday, August 25th, 2007 at 11:32 am PST
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Sniperfiend Tuesday, April 17th, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month33 of 36 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
2 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tippmann 98C, Rap4 T68 Gen 1/2, BT-4 Combat
Marker Setup: Primary:

Spyder MR1 - Stock
20 oz Pure Energy CO2 tank
Archon Gravity fed hopper (dual feed ramps, up to 11.6bps)
Oregon Scientific ATC-2K Video cam (barrel attached)

Secondary:

Rap4 T68 Gen1/2 M4/M16 Marker with M203 air conversion kit.
Extreme Rage agitated Hopper
Recommended
Upgrades:
BT Apex Barrel
Reflex Site
Remote Line
Strengths: Rugged and Durable
Aesthetics
Accurate
Consistent
Easy field maintenance
Weaknesses: Relative lack of accessories in comparison to other markers
A bit heavy
Review: This marker was initially purchased as my secondary/backup marker, with the T68 mentioned above as my primary. After the number of issues I've had with the T68 (air issues, weight, e-grip/battery issues, lack of "acceptance" at some fields, etc.), I've switched over to the MR1 for my primary.

First Impressions

This marker is well packaged and comes with a standard tool kit and replacement parts and an ok manual. The fit and finish of the materials are top notch. The marker is easy to put together out of the box, even for relative newcomers to paintball.

Performance

This marker easily outperforms any rental marker and most store bought markers (in the same price range/genre) that I've come across. Shots are consistent and on target up to 75 ft with stock barrel. Shots will travel further than 75ft, but I've found with the stock barrel that those shots were rarely effective (read: ball breaks) or on target at greater than 100ft.

I did note some drop off in velocity during rapid fire, but I suppose you get that on most markers without an expansion chamber. From my testing, the hopper that came with the marker package only allowed a fire rate of 3 or 4 bps. The Archon hopper noted above allowed a much higher RoF (around 7 bps consistent, I'd say). Only chopped one ball out of about 1000 fired, and at the time it wasn't me firing the marker (a friend borrowed it for a round of play) so I didn't observe the conditions that led to the misfire. I did note that the adjustable feed neck was a bit skewed when the marker was returned to me, so that may have contributed to the problem.

Maintenance and Repair

Initial takedown of the marker is pretty straightforward. One pin for the velocity adjuster/spring assembly and another for the bolt. Clearing a chop/jam is a bit more involved, though. Especially if the ball is caught between the feed neck and the bolt, as was the case with the above referenced issue. Still, I had the marker back up and running within 5 minutes of recieving it, including cleaning the post-chop paint residue both inside and out. Did not have to refer to the manual for any of this (not that that's any great achievement, just a testament on how easy the marker is to work on).

Value

Purchased this maker in a package that included a 20oz pure energy CO2 tank, Vforce armor goggles, Java 200 rd hopper, and Spyder butt pack with 4 smoke colored 140rd tubes. Total cost of package was $144. From what I understand you can pick up the marker alone for less than $90 at many online retailers. For what you get, I think this marker is an excellent value. If you play paintball three times, you'll have recouped what you would have laid out in rental fees and had a better paintball experience for it.

Upgradeability

This is the only category that I've seen where this marker may be lacking. While I have noted a number of upgrades (barrels, hoppers, feed necks, etc), the sheer amount of upgrades available for other markers in this class (think Tippmann 98C's) far outpace what is available for the MR series.

Conclusion: I really like this marker. I think that the price is right for what you get, you can hold your own on fields during walk-on woodsball/recball and scenario games (probably wouldn't play tournaments with it, though). The marker is rugged, easily maintained, aesthetically pleasing, and comfortable to use. A bonus is that the marker comes with its own stock, which is quite useful. From my perspective, the only thing I see that detracts from this marker is the upgradability issue, which may improve over time. For that I'd rate the marker a 9.5, but since the numbers don't go into decimal placement for ratings, I'll give it a solid 9.
Rating:
9 out of 10
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