paintball

  Join pbreview.com  |  Log In  
pbReview.com - Paintball Reviews and Paintball Fields

Search:

  
Home     |      Paintball Articles     |      Paintball Videos     |     Paintball Gear     |     Paintball Fields     |     Paintball Stores     |     Hot Deals     |     Paintball Forums     |     Chat
pbReview.com / Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol / Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol / Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol / Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol

Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol Reviews

  Sponsored Links   

Discount Real Action Paintball

Buy Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol

Paintball Pistols

Paintball Hoppers

Paintball Clothing


Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol
[ View Photos (3) - Add Your Photo ]
Number of Reviews: 7
Average Rating: 6.4 / 10
Manufacturer Website: Click here
Suggested Retail Price: $299

Manufacturer DescriptionSubscribe to Reviews on this Product - Edit this Product Listing
The RAP226. A 1-to-1 scale replica of the legendary Sig Sauer 226, the RAP226 is designed to replicate the look, feel, and functionality of the real Sig 226 handgun widely used by law enforcement agencies around the world. The RAP226 is a redesign of the popular RAP17, with enhancements to improve the overall performance and reliability of the marker. The unit design has a new magazine reload mechanism, making each reload easier while also helping to prevent jams. The magazine of the RAP226 been redesigned, too, and is now composed of metal instead of the plastic of the previous version.

The RAP226 functions like a real handgun with strong blowback action. It is powered by a refillable, internal, built-in CO2 reservoir inside the handgrip which can shoot 30 rounds of .43 caliber paintballs per each fill. A RAP226 EX version that uses a 12g disposable CO2 cylinder inside the handgrip is also available, capable of fire 50 shots per cylinder.

Both the slide and internal mechanism are made of hardened metal alloy and steel that can withstand any condition of use. The barrel is made of light-weight aluminum, helping to keep the overall weight of the marker down. The pistol frame is marked by rugged construction that can withstand drops and rough use. This is the most significant improvement of the RAP226, and answers requests by many agencies that the new pistol be able to survive in the training arena.

The RAP226 does not eject shell casings. Up to 10 paintball marking rounds are loaded into a magazine, and the magazine is inserted into the handgrip. Like a real handgun, the RAP226 stops shooting when out of ammunition. The muzzle velocity is adjustable, topping out between 250fps and 300fps. The effective range of the RAP17 is 20m (65ft), and the maximum range is 50m (160ft).
Product Availability 
The Real Action Paintball Sig Sauer 226 Paintball Pistol is older, so while it may be available used and in a few cases new, it is not commonly available anymore.
Places to Buy
No StoresSponsored Links

Write a review and share your thoughts with other paintballers.
Show:
Stan_the_HitMan Tuesday, November 28th, 2006
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month22 of 22 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Other Paintball handguns and real handguns, this is more like a real handgun.
Recommended
Upgrades:
---
Strengths: : Realistic Operation, Realistic Looks, Intimidating
Weaknesses: .43 cal, Flaw in Magazine spring
Review:
Review: After waiting almost 2 months for this Handgun to clear customs at the Canadian Boarder I finally got 3 in the mail (one for me, one for my friend who is a police officer and uses an identical fire arm at work, and his friend.)

I will break this review down into 5 categories (Looks and cosmetics, Features/special attributes, Shooting and related, Air and related, and Durability and maintenance), each with a potential of two points to be given or taken away.


-<LOOKS>-

If it were not for the orange tip and a small knob to take the 12 gram co2 out on the handle, this marker would look almost 100% identical to a real P226

+1


Slide goes back every time you shoot and stays back when the Magazine is emptied…Need I say more?


+1

2/2

-<FETURES / SPECIAL ATTRIBUTES>-

The Rap226 features basically everything a real p226 does, double action hammer, Working slide, De-cock button Slide Catch release, Grip rail for lasers/flashlights/other, Mag release, and more.

+1

When the hammer cycles it hits a little button (where the primer for the bullet would be on the real thing) and this opens the valve causing the gas to be expelled thus shooting a ball. Then the excess gasses blow the slide back re-cocking the gun and putting another round in the chamber. This is quite different from other paintball pistols like a Zeus or Delta 68, and not to mention much cooler.

+1

2/2


-<SHOOTING AND RELATED>-

The accuracy of this marker was about average, about a six inch pattern at 30 feet, but from a combination of a heavy trigger pull and high recoil accuracy would drastically go down when shooting rapidly ( 3 foot pattern at 30 feet)

Do I think this is a bad thing? NO! I think it is awesome, it feels like shooting a real 9mm hand gun. Realistic recoil compared to other paintball hand guns made it all the more fun to shoot. If I were a police officer buying one for the purpose of better familiarizing myself with a weapon like the one I used at work I would chose to have this one over a handgun in theory with zero recoil that looked like a laser blaster from a science fiction movie.

+1

Reloading was fast and fun. You know your magazine is empty because the marker stops cycling and the slide stays back. Then it is simply a matter of how fast you can press the magazine release and put a new one in and hit the slide release with your thumb on the side. With little practice one could reload this faster than someone using a normal paintball Handgun and 10 round tubes.

+1


2/2


-<AIR AND RELATED>-

There are two versions of the Rap226, Internal and external air. I chose the External air because it uses 12 grams which are readily available, the internal air version had an adapter you screwed onto your co2 tank that would charge an internal reserve inside the handgun. I cannot comment on that version as I have never tried it, but a 12 gram was good for 3 full magazines before the slide stopped going back when you shot. If times were dire one could cock the slide manually to shoot one shot at a time, but 3 mags for 1 12 gram is good efficiency.

+1


The 12 gram changer was a 2 stage chamber. You put the 12 gram into holder that screws out and insert it back in. Screw it in all the way to seal the 12 gram inside. The second stage is a separate knob on the 12 gram holder that was there to break the seal on the 12 gram to air the gun up. Little to no air is wasted this way, and it makes it easy to take the 12 gram out, usually I found on the Zeus G2 the 12 grams were prone to sticking in the gun, with this two stage system the 12 gram never sticks because it is in a threaded holder. This new feature makes it allot easier.

+1



2/2


-<DURABILITY AND MAINTENANCE>-

This Marker was built very sturdy, it is all metal except for the grip which is an high quality impact polymer, I cant imagine it breaking. This gun just feels solid in your hands, like a real Sig 226.

+1

Maintenance was simple, Keep the barrel clean and oil the necessary moving parts once in a while. The core of the marker was accessible as need be, but it is recommended that you don’t tamper with it, and why should you. From all three I have used they are ready to go and tuned out of the box.

+1

2/2
Conclusion: Conclusion:

The only thing I have found on this gun that could be considered a problem is the magazine spring stock is to stiff and can dimple soft paintballs, a fix to this problem is a new lighter spring or the “Hard” .43 cal paintballs.

- 0.5

As long as you can get around the .43 cal barrier this is a mighty handgun indeed. It looks, feels, and shoots like a Real P226, and is a very high quality product. This handgun impresses me beyond any marker I have received from rap4. It has a heavy price tag (just a bit more than a Tiberius 8), but if you want to most realistic there is out there it comes at a price.

I can only began to imagine what a marker like this could offer to police and military training for real engagement scenarios.

To sum it up this handgun went above and beyond my expectations I had for it, to be frank I was expecting something of much less quality and performance.

I give it a 9.5 / 10, round to 10/10 on PBR, I don’t usually give products 10/10 but given that i have to chose between 9/10 and 10/10 this handgun has earned a 10 with me, An awesome Handgun with minimal margin of improvement.



Rating:
9 out of 10Last edited on Sunday, April 5th, 2009 at 9:16 am PST
I found this review  
0 Comments - Add Comment

Cacophony Sunday, May 27th, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
3 months7 of 7 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
3 years
Similar
Products Used:
1) Tiberius Arms TAC-8 (superior, 10/10)
2) Tiberius Arms T9 (superior, 10/10)
3) APSRAM Walther P99 (superior, 9/10)
4) PMI Pirhana USP (inferior, 7/10)
5) Ariakon ACP 2.0 (inferior, 6/10)
6) Sheridan PGP (N/A)
Marker Setup: Primary weapon: Tippmann A-5 with Special Ops commando stock & A-5A2 foregrip; Smart Parts Freak Back with Hammerhead Pro Tip front barrel; Simmons 40mm red dot scope; JCS dovetail-to-weaver offset rail; PMI coiled remote line with slide check; Palmer Pursuit inline stabilizer; PMI 72cu/3000psi HPA tank.

Alternate Primary: CCI VSC Phantom with 45 grip, White Wolf Airsmithing Stealth 11" barrel & trigger shoe, ball detents.

Secondary weapon: Tiberius Arms TAC-8 pistol with 3 extra magazines.
Recommended
Upgrades:
1) ~3 extra magazines
2) Quality magazine holster
Strengths: 1) Accurate to ~50 feet
2) Air efficient
3) Mil-Sim realism
Weaknesses: 1) 0.43 caliber rounds
2) Difficult maintanence
3) No velocity adjustment
Review: I have been testing several different pistol markers over the last 6 months trying to find an effective alternative to the Tiberius Arms TAC-8 and T9. The size of the TAC-8 is somewhat unwieldy for my wife's small hands. The APSRAM (RAP4) P-Series markers appeal to me due to their realistic size and weight. These markers use 0.43 caliber paintballs rather than the standard 0.68 caliber rounds. This discrepancy will be prohibitive to many people as 0.43 caliber rounds are primarily sold online and are not readily available at local retailers. Furthermore, many professional fields may have restrictions on standardized paintballs, thus, precluding 0.43 caliber markers from being used. We host our games on private property and don't have such restrictions; thus, I am at liberty to use whatever marker I desire. The APSRAM Sig Sauer 226 is the first APSRAM marker I purchased (actually, I purchased two markers on a whim after watching John Woo's "Hard-Boiled"). While I am pleased with the overall performance of these markers, each marker has performed differently which I will discuss below.


SETUP:

The APSRAM Sig Sauer 226 is a nearly 1:1 replica of the Sig Sauer 226 in weight and functionality. The marker is packaged in a small, hard plastic carrying case that includes marker oil, cleaning cloth, squeege, instruction manual, and warranty card. The carrying case itself can either accommodate the marker and up to 4 spare magazines or two Sig Sauer 226 markers with the markers positioned at an angle. The Sig Sauer 226 fires 0.43 caliber paintballs as described above. Of note, only a couple manufacturers produce 0.43 caliber paintballs and the various distributors online share the same suppliers. The Sig Sauer 226 magazine has a retention lever that compresses a spring and locks in place so that paintballs can be loaded. These 0.43 caliber paintballs fit into magazines that accommodate 9 rounds; a 10th round can be forced into the magazine, but the metal edge of the magazine often scratches the surface of the 10th round and is associated with more frequent ball breaks.

The marker uses a 12-gram CO2 cartridge that loads directly into the pistol grip. The CO2 cartridge adapter is a 2-stage device which works extremely well at minimizing wasted CO2: the 1st stage secures the 12-gram CO2 cartridge into the housing and the 2nd stage actually pierces the CO2 cartidge itself. The magazine and 12-gram CO2 cartridge are inserted separately (unlike the Tiberius Arms TAC-8 and T9).

The Sig Sauer 226 has a realistic blowback slide system that chambers each round into the breech after the marker is discharged. The slide remains locked in place once the last round is fired (just like its real counterpart). The marker cannot be fired again until the slide is released. The empty magazine is released by depressing a button located on the grip at the base of the trigger guard. A loaded magazine can then be inserted and a round is automatically chambered once the slide is released. The safety mechanism is located directly on the trigger itself.

The Sig Sauer 226 is nicely weighted. It is compact and well-balanced in the hand. The weight of the marker is appropriately distributed even after a 12-gram CO2 cartridge and full magazine are loaded into the grip. The grip is small enough for my wife to comfortably hold the marker (unlike the Tiberius Arms TAC-8). The marker is not ambidextrous as the slide release lever, decocking lever, and magazine release button are all located on the located on left side of the body. All three are conveniently located for an individual's right thumb, but left-handed pistoleros may find these functions awkward at first.


PERFORMANCE:

The Sig Sauer 226 is very accurate at 25-50 feet. I fired the marker from a modern isoceles stance. I used standard RAP4 .43 caliber paintballs (not the hard shell rounds). My target was positioned at distances of 25 and 50 feet both indoors (76 degrees) and outdoors (56 degrees, no wind, dusk). Because the slide re-cocks after every round fired, accuracy suffers tremendously with rapid fire. I tested each marker separately with single shots only. The following are the results of each marker:

Marker 1:
25 Feet:
Indoors: 27/27 within a 2-inch radius around the bull's eye (13 hit center).
Outdoors: 26/27 within a 2-inch radius around the bull's eye (9 hit center; 1 hit ~4 inches off center).

50 Feet:
Indoors: 23/27 within a 3-inch radius around the bull's eye (3 hit center; 3 hit ~5 inches off center; 1 hit ~7 inches off center).
Outdoors: 22/27 within a 3-inch radius around the bull's eye (1 hit center; 2 hit ~5 inches off center; 2 hit ~7 inches off center, 1 missed the 18-inch target).

Marker 2*:
25 Feet:
Indoors: 25/27 within a 2-inch radius around the bull's eye (8 hit center, 2 hit ~4 inches off center).
Outdoors: 24/27 within a 2-inch radius around the bull's eye (7 hit center; 1 hit ~4 inches off center, 2 hit ~6 inches off center).

50 Feet:
Indoors: 22/27 within a 3-inch radius around the bull's eye (none hit center; 2 hit ~5 inches off center; 2 hit ~7 inches off center, 1 hit ~9 inches off center).
Outdoors: 21/27 within a 3-inch radius around the bull's eye (2 hit center; 1 hit ~5 inches off center; 3 hit ~7 inches off center, 2 hit ~9 inches off center).

* Unlike the APSRAM P99, the rear sight on the Sig Sauer 226 is not adjustable. I noticed that Marker 2 had a slight leftward deviation of its projectiles. I had to compensate for the poorly calibrated sights by aiming slightly to the right.

I have used these two APSRAM Sig Sauer 226 markers several times in the last 2 months. While I preferentially use Marker 1, I dual-wielded both on occasion and have experienced their collective performance enough to give an adequate review. I am very pleased with the Sig Sauer 226 on our speedball field. The Sig Sauer 226 is highly accurate up to ~40 feet and effective to a maximum range of ~60 feet. I could reliably land paint within 6 inches of my target at 40 feet. Accuracy quickly declines beyond 50 feet. They did not perform well on our woodsball field. The firing lanes in our woods are often 75-100 feet long which the Sig Sauer 226 did not manage effectively. Paint usually landed within 2 feet of my target at 100 feet which I found unacceptable (compared to my Tiberius Arms TAC-8 and T9 which could reliably land paint within 8 inches at similar distances). I believe the 0.43 caliber paintballs account for the poor long-range accuracy due to their size and susceptibility to wind and shell imperfections.

The velocity is subjectively very consistent, but I cannot verify this at this time. The projectiles sound like they have a velocity of ~250-260 FPS, but I will have to test further and update this review. I bought a cheap X-Radar chronometer that doesn't seem to like my 0.43 caliber rounds.

The APSRAM Sig Sauer 226 has remarkable air efficiency. You will understand why once you have listened to a loaded APSRAM P-Series marker being fired: they are amazingly silent (I fired 7 magazines' worth of paintballs while talking on my cell phone without the other person knowing that I was target shooting). I typically get 70-80 shots per 12-gram CO2 cartridge. This equates to 8 or 9 magazines loaded with 9 rounds per magazine. I had a little drop off on the last 4-5 rounds fired and the slide often needs manual recocking for the last 5-6 shots. I like the pneumatics of the Sig Sauer 226 more than the Tiberius Arms TAC-8 and T9: I like having smaller magazines that aren't weighed down by self-contained CO2 cartridges. Both markers initially leaked air when I loaded a 12-gram CO2 cartridge for the first time. The leaking stopped after dry-firing 3-4 times and I have not had any air leaks in either marker ever since.

APSRAM constructs their magazines with high-grade aluminum. The magazines accommodate the 0.43 caliber paintballs well; no excessive spacing in the housing that allows paint to rattle (i.e. Ariakon ACP 2.0 magazines). The magazines are nice and compact. They have a much smaller base compared to the APSRAM Walther P99. I can comfortably fit 4 magazines into a cargo pouch or 2 into a magazine holster securely. A great feature found with all APSRAM magazines is that paintballs do not eject from the magazine if the retention lever is accidentally released. Plastic ball detents built into magazine itself prevent the 0.43 caliber rounds from ejecting even if the retention bar is released. Double-feeding only occurs if I am manually recocking the marker when I am running low on air: the double-feeds are entirely my fault, not a flaw within the marker's design. However, double-feeding is always associated with ball breaks. I noticed that the 0.43 caliber paintballs had indentations in them when I ejected several magazines from the markers. Several other reviewers have mentioned similar complaints as well. I used a wire cutter to shorten the springs in my magazines by 0.75 inches. The paintballs continue to feed well and I no longer find indentations on them.

Marker 1 had multiple ball breaks inside its barrel when I first used it. I had 6 ball breaks within the first 50 rounds I fired during my initial testing. I used the paint provided with the marker package I purchased. I suspect the paint that came with the package was old. I have not had a single ball break since I purchased fresh paint from www.rap4.com. RAP4 does retail a newer "hard shell" paintball that reportedly had fewer ball breaks, but I have not tested this product. Marker 1 has performed very well ever since I acquired new paintballs.

Marker 2 has had several issues. The marker's sights are incorrectly calibrated as described above. The slide is somewhat tempermental as well. Several teammates have trialed Marker 2 and reported that the slide often sticks in its locked position even if there are rounds still in the magazine. They have to repeatedly release the slide after each round fired for the first magazine once a new 12-gram CO2 cartridge is loaded. The slide usually works appropriately after ~10 shots. Conversely, the slide fails to lock on occasion once the magazine is empty resulting in dry firing for 1-2 shots before finally locking back.


MAINTENANCE:

Like the APSRAM Walther P99, the Sig Sauer 226 requires virtually no maintenance. In fact, the marker's warranty will be void if you disassemble it. Thus, the velocity cannot be adjusted without voiding the warranty. If the marker needs velocity adjustments or servicing, it must be sent back to the manufacturer (APSRAM, not RAP4). Maintenance basically consists of cleaning the barrel, oiling the slide, and wiping off the exterior. I oil the CO2 cartridge seal by placing a couple drops on the tip of a used 12-gram CO2 cartridge and reinserting the adapter into the grip. The manual includes no maintenance instructions which upsets me. Cleaning the barrel is simple: attach the cleaning cloth to the end of the squeege, eject the magazine, pull back the slide, insert the squeege into the barrel from the base of the barrel, and pull the squeege through to the front of the barrel. The stock squeege works well.

I need to send Marker 2 back to the manufacturer for servicing. I will post how my interactions with APSRAM proceed in the near future.
Conclusion: The APSRAM Sig Sauer 226 is a fun marker to use. It is very air efficient and accurate up to medium distances (25-50 feet). I am a little disappointed that one of my two Sig Sauer 226 markers is not as consistent as the other one. Obviously, this calls into question the marker's quality of manufacturing. The other Sig Sauer 226 and my Walther P99 both work amazingly well--perhaps the malfunctioning marker doesn't accurately represent APSRAM's quality?

For general consideration, I would ask the reader to question if a 0.43 caliber paintball marker is a reasonable investment. 0.43 caliber paintballs have limited manufacturers. Quality and performance are not as standardized as 0.68 caliber paintballs. Please reference my review of the APSRAM Walther P99 for a more thorough discussion regarding RAP4 0.43 caliber paintballs (I will post a full review of RAP4 0.43 caliber paintballs after I've gone through a few thousand more rounds and tried their hard shell paintballs). I personally don't mind using 0.43 caliber paintballs, but some people may not want to purchase two different types of paint.

Comparatively, the Sig Sauer 226 is equally as effective as the Tiberius Arms TAC-8/T9 and Walther P99 up to ~40 feet. I prefer my Walther P99 over the Sig Sauer 226 because it has performed slightly more consistently at medium to moderate ranges (up to 65 feet). The Tiberius Arms TAC-8/T9 is still far superior at ranges beyond 50 feet. As a collector of paintball markers, I enjoy having this marker in my repertoire. But I would recommend the Walther P99 or a Tiberius Arms marker to anyone wanting a functional field marker.
Rating:
8 out of 10Last edited on Sunday, May 27th, 2007 at 8:13 pm PST
I found this review  
7 Comments - Add Comment

maxsutter Friday, October 6th, 2006
Period of
Product Use:
Only tested6 of 28 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
3 years
Similar
Products Used:
macdev cyborg , Ion
Marker Setup: 2 olive 06 cyborgs nitroduck xstream 90inch(dont buy nitroduck) - halo cheetah,
Strengths: it is heavy and feels like a real gun - It does feel solid.
Weaknesses: Paint scratches easily no manual no instruction no support from rap4
Review: I had the gun less then 4 hrs and I broke it under the direction of RAP4 as they did not provide any manual nor videos for dissably or repair. - I was unable to get the gun set at a moderate speed. it would vary between below 250 fps and above 290fps so the gun was unusable as It is not scenario legal -I use an xradar. I figure I could just sneek it an no one would know.

1. unable to chrom the gun without - taking it apart ( while doing so I broke a few pieces under the direction of RAP4 support person)
2.The design of the clip removal causes the gun to leak each time a clip is removed.
3. cleaning out breaks is very difficult.
4. .43 caliber paint
5. I would break 2-3 balls of every 10
6. very innacurate (due to constant breaking at any speed)
7. have to jam in the 10th ball
8. you have to cock back the gun after you load a clip or it will dry fire


for looks - if you paint that orange tip - It looks awsome. It failed in too many ways to keep it as a workign pistol even as a limted backup It is not worth the money . The RAP4 person told me to get their t68 pistol which is the most reliable and only $125.

Look it is 1st generation and very cool feelign gun with a kick - it scores marks in those department but as far as a gun you really want to shoot - the kick is tremendous as far as paintball goes and well as we ll know you dont want any kick in paintball gun if you can help - which makes this pistol shoot all over the place.

Now I am faced with a 25% restocking fee - after having the gun for 4 hrs. I need to get a back up marker but even thoughg they knew they basically told me to take it apart incorrectly and I broke 2 pieces on their account they are sticking it to me.

I am used to spending over 1k on markers. I beleive in buying quality that is why I have the macdev cyborg and I want to clean then and maintain them. I am unable to take care of this gun or adjust it.
Conclusion: poor support - no videos - RAP4 with poor instruyctions forced me to break 2 pieces on the gun. This gun is a failure as far as performance and any ease of maintence. I dont normally score products with a zero - but their mistake is costing me over $100

it is the 1st run and they need to fix the design issues - I just got a lemon - the desing flaws are inherent but I doubt then can solve the major issues of velocity adjustment, leaking co2 system, and dissamble made easy

For looks it is the best looking gun around. I will give it that but I can buy an airsoft replica of the p226 that is lot less expensive and shoots paint.
Rating:
1 out of 10
I found this review  
8 Comments - Add Comment

allgunsblazing Monday, March 3rd, 2008
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month3 of 3 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
2 years
Similar
Products Used:
Other paintball pistols- lighter, .68 but in no means even half as realistic as this.
Marker Setup: Proto rail
Empire Barrel Kit
Random Brand on/off
Victory Boarded Halo
TechT Bolt
Virtue Red Laser eyes
Red UL Trigger
Red Ndz Buttons
Red Proto Eye Covers
Red Hybrid Traitor back-cap

Tippmann 98
G36C hand guard and rail
Six Position Stock
Tasco 30mm sight
Freak Jr. barrel
Ak mag kit
Polished Internals
Trigger Spring Mod
Remote line
Dishka Flash Suppressor
48/3000 psi

Ram 50
Recommended
Upgrades:
Laser sight or flashlight
Good holster - the marker is heavy, not something you can just pack around in your waistband on the field.
Clips
Strengths: Realistic
Blowback
Slide locks
Weaknesses: Leaks happen.
Cannot disassemble without warranty breach.
Review: Bought this my new Ram 50 from section 8 sports in Taber, it was between this or the Ram 17. After reading reviews online, i found the Ram 226 had be slightly redesigned into the Ram 50. I decided to give it a try.

Packing- the marker comes in a Ram pistol hard case, which in a must for transporting this marker. A red BBD is included, along with marker oil, a users manual, and a squeegee.

Looks- Real, Matte black. That's all that needs to be said. Mine doesn't have a orange tip even. uhhh, word of advice, never leave the house without this marker in its case. My little brother found it while i was home for the weekend and figured it was real pistol, till he popped the clip. A under barrel weaver mount is supplied for laser sights, flashlights,

or whatever your little heart desires.

Feel- Picking it up, it feels like a real pistol, the weight is very similar to one, not for a kid who has trouble with the weight of his tippy. People with smaller hands may have some trouble with the grips, personally I don't, but that problem could arise.

Firing- With a 500 pack of rubber balls, and after wiping the barrel clean, I proceeded to put clip after clip of the balls into my designated target. I was only firing from a range of about 15' close for paintball but reasonable for what you will be using your pistol for. ie. room clearing. Every shot fires results in the slide blowing back like a real firearm.... and its not a light blow back like cheap airsoft pistols, you do know that its coming back at you. After 10 rounds, the slide locks back signaling and screaming to all that know firearms....."HEY, HEY YOU! , SHOOT ME I"M EMPTY" better have a spare clip or your primary marker reloaded, because reloading the clips can be a hassle. you must pull a spring down, lock it in place a shove the balls in as fast as possible before the action of reloading the clip knocks the locked spring out of place and it launches 1-7 rubber balls at high speed at your face.I'm sure with a proper amount of practice you could get this down to an art....personally i'm just going to buy two or three more clips. Ejecting the clip, and putting it back in is just like real handguns. Clip release, new clip, unlock the slide, and a ball is in the chamber.

Accuracy- i have no real numbers, however at 15 feet with rubber balls and a standard two hand stance, the stock sights tended to be a little high and right. a laser sight could rectify this little problem. Grouping was very decent firing slow, at our set distance of 15' we were able to put 10 balls into the bottom end of a diameter of a pop can. Faster firing showed about the diameter of a super big gulp cup.

Notes/Other useful/General info- I have experienced several leaks, which usually tend to subside after you cycle the marker once, or let it sit....which you should do is a 50/50 chance. The safety is located on the trigger itself. The clip, slide lock and decocker are all located on the right side of the marker. which would make it inconvenient for lefties. with the external air version, a 12 gram co2 tank is inserted into a two stage chamber, which ins pretty cool. The 12 gram can be screwed in, and stored in the marker, ready for action, but not punctured and the marker not gassed up. Screwing in a second part of the chamber pushes the 12 gram up and punctures the tank, gassing up with marker. NOTE.. this marker must be cocked, with the slide locked back when screwing in the c02 tank. I do not know what happens if it isn't, but I'm not about to find out. Generally I found myself to be able to get about 50 shots to a single 12 gram.

Warranty- Section 8 sports in Taber, Alberta is the only approved Canadian warrenty place i do believe... consider getting your marker through them, they test every one before it is sold.

Conclusion: Overall very impressed with this marker. feels real, looks real, other than slight leaks... no major troubles.
Rating:
8 out of 10
I found this review  
0 Comments - Add Comment

HellcatCommando Monday, April 2nd, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
3 months3 of 3 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
More than 5 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tiberius 8
Marker Setup: Spyder MR3 16" Double Rifled Barrel
Spyder Fasta Loader
Sig Sauer RAM 226 Pistol
Recommended
Upgrades:
None
Strengths: Size
Sound
Weight
Weaknesses: .43 Caliber
Review: This gun was exactly what I was looking for. I understood that .43 caliber catches the wind like a feather but I was out to get a novelty gun. The operation of this thing is identical to the real thing. If you want a fully functional pistol, I would reccomend the TAC 8, but this thing filled what I needed. As with any pistol, you need extra clips to help you when you are really using it. You can only get .43 paintballs through certian online stores, and most of them are sort of aged and have a real tough shell. Most of my shots bounced off my friends (but they are fat, we fatties are almost immune to paintballs exploding on us). The gun had a kick and the action worked just as it does on the real Sig. The weight was accurate and there was almost NO PLASTIC on the gun. Real Action Marker sure did a very good job on this gun. And best of all, its quiet. You don't here the thing shoot (quite unlike the real thing). The trigger pull is non-adjustable, as it is to match the trigger pull of a real Sig 226 (6 punds of force).
Conclusion: Its sort of more for looks, but is an excellent short range back-up. It is fully functional and amazingly realistic. The disadvantages would be how it is .43 caliber. Lets the paintballs literally fly away from you. I would still reccomend, but again. If you are looking for a fully functional pistol (I mean to use frequently and play rough), I would reccomend the Tiberius.
Rating:
9 out of 10
I found this review  
0 Comments - Add Comment

Lancer3 Thursday, May 3rd, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month3 of 5 people found this review helpful.

Paintball
Experience:
4 years
Similar
Products Used:
Tiberius TAC-8(Buddys Pistol)
Marker Setup: Tippmann A-5, LPK, Panmer Stabilizer, Hammerhead Barrel System, E-Grip
Strengths: Look
Feel
Realistic Operation
Weaknesses: Leaks
Few Shots
Support
Review: I purchased this pistol a month ago. I got to test it the first time a few days after receiving it. I got the internal air version. I filled the tank according to the instructions. I noticed a leak. I inserted a magazine and started shooting. First five shots were great. After that, there wasnt enough air to push the action back. The gun was still firing with air but without the slide moving back nothing was reloading.
I figured, ok, I charged it wrong. I recharged it. Again with the leaks. Again I only got about 5 shots from it. I posted to RAP4's forums about the problem. I got a response from another member but not RAP4.
Im currently in the process of trying to return the gun for a refund.
Conclusion: The gun looks, feels and fires great for the first couple shots. If I had gotten good support it may have turned out well.
I wouldnt recommend buying this gun. From what Ive read about it on RAP4's forums and here I shouldnt have purchased it either, especially for the price. Get a Tiberius.
Rating:
3 out of 10Last edited on Thursday, May 3rd, 2007 at 3:18 pm PST
I found this review  
1 Comment - Add Comment

sniper28273482 Monday, April 23rd, 2007
Period of
Product Use:
Less than a month
Paintball
Experience:
3 years
Similar
Products Used:
My friends Pistol
Marker Setup: Tippmann A-5 with stock, 20" J&J ceramics barrel, BSA 42mm Red dot, Remote line, Expansion Chamber, custom made front grip,
Recommended
Upgrades:
A new Core, Holster
Strengths: Very Realistic, Heavy duty, compact, realistic action.
Weaknesses: Leaks like it's its job.
Review: Ok well first off I bought this product on Ebay directly from APS paintball. It took 2 weeks to arrive and was in great shape. I had ordered the 2 magazine and 1000 paintballs package. I opened the case and loved the gun, nearly all of it was metal including the clips. I had to wait for C02 for my friend to show up. The slide release and mag release and decocker all worked perfectly. Then my friend showed up and the gun leaked air as soon as I put it in. The leaking stopped after about 5 shot but whenever I put in a new co2 it leaked. The slide functioned even so. The accuracy was below normal for a regular gun. 10 yard and you could hit about a 1 ft pattern. I am waiting now to find out how to stop the leaking.
Conclusion: Decent gun, I wish it wouldn't leak. It needs to be cheaper.
Rating:
7 out of 10
I found this review  
1 Comment - Add Comment
Write a review and share your thoughts with other paintballers.
Show:
Places to Buy
No StoresSponsored Links


Help / FAQ  |  Contact Us  |  About Us  |  Advertising Info  |  Link to Us  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Use
Top

Paintball Review

Copyright © 2000-2014 Hillclimb Media